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I am in Kitchener and Bustards Chrysler Jeep Ram dealership offers Corrosion Free. I agree with not having Canadian Tire do it, but do you think it would be safe to have Bustard's do it?

I have no way of finding out what rust proofing had been done in the past. The used car lot I am dealing with bought it from a Mazda dealership as a trade in and he had no info about the rust proofing. However the salesman use to own a Rust Check in Guelph and he said he figured the vehicle had been rust proofed with one of those lifetime type rust proofing.

I did find a place in Stratford that does Fluid Film. So of the two which would you recommend? Fluid Film or Corrosion Free.

FYI the Millenium Tire place in Oakville does Fluid Film but with their website saying its a "no drill" application (so I presume they don't spray in doors and body cavities) then I don't think this would address the weak spots such as the dogleg area in these vans. I think for now I will stick with Krown.
 

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What are you doing for inside door panels, quarter panels, rocker panels and rear hatch? What about up front cross members? How do you wash in those places? No salt getting in there?
Drier, colder air maybe?
The under body is not the major concern for rusting here. It's the inside hidden areas that are most concerning and no washing from outside is going to help that. Corrosion proofing will.

An old Corrosivity Map of North America
Ensuring they get cleaned when washing, outside of that, nothing.
I'm in WI, where moist air and salt use are an everyday occurrence.

While I agree most corrosion happens from the inside out, proper cleaning with a pressure washer gets the junk out of most areas and negates the majority of it.
 
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What are you doing for inside door panels, quarter panels, rocker panels and rear hatch? What about up front cross members? How do you wash in those places? No salt getting in there?
Drier, colder air maybe?
The under body is not the major concern for rusting here. It's the inside hidden areas that are most concerning and no washing from outside is going to help that. Corrosion proofing will.

An old Corrosivity Map of North America
Hmm, so pictures and somebody's word about their "rustless" experience or strategy doesn't somehow cut it, eh?
 

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Hmm, so pictures and somebody's word about their "rustless" experience or strategy doesn't somehow cut it, eh?
Not on this site man. It has to be expertly proven to have weight around here. Pictures, dyno proven results, or anything else that says contrary are untrue unless expertly proven.
 
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Hmm, so pictures and somebody's word about their "rustless" experience or strategy doesn't somehow cut it, eh?
Didn't say that, just trying to find out how washing could remove salt ions from the rocker panels, dog leg, rear quarter panel, etc. areas. The sliding door pockets contain some drain holes into the rocker panels, I suppose they could be used. The rocker panels contain two big drain holes per side. I suppose they could be used. Don't know..

Some vans were better prepared in the factory than others and were less rust prone. Some vehicles have more drain holes than others. The 4th Generation is rust prone, especially the Grand, in the rocker panel and dog leg area. Foam intrusions from the pillars, blocking rocker panel drainage, doesn't help either, in fact, that feature retained moisture.. I had a 2007 DGC that the drain holes were blocked with sealant and needed to be cleaned out.

In 5+ years of heavy exposure to road salt, rust inside the rockers panels could weaken the internal support structure for the jack, hence bending or punching. Use of the hoists in the Shops would bend the vertical edge. I salvaged the rocker panels for the 2007 somewhat by pouring transmission fluid directly into the rocker panels. I never did replace the rocker panels, just did some repairs..

There are situations where washing isn't the most effective solution, especially if pounded through 30 miles of slush a day. Washing during freezing temperatures isn't practical. Washing during mild temperatures is done by the rain. Does car wash water contain salt during the winter? Apparently so. That's not good either.

Conclusion: Long-Voyager does an excellent job of vehicle washing. His Van looks pristine. Personal experiences may vary. :)
 

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I need to get pictures of the 2006 that's in our family.
Same deal, just frequent washing, a good sealer before winter, and it still looks almost showroom despite 168k miles in Wi winters.
 

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FYI the Millenium Tire place in Oakville does Fluid Film but with their website saying its a "no drill" application (so I presume they don't spray in doors and body cavities) then I don't think this would address the weak spots such as the dogleg area in these vans. I think for now I will stick with Krown.
There are drain holes in the doors, hatch, and rocker panels that can be used. I usually use those as well as any plugged holes, OE or otherwise, that give access. While I was doing the Jeep yesterday, I put the wand in the drain holes (two per side) for my 2016 DGC's rocker panels, and sprayed in all directions, just to add more product.

The Fluid Film process tends not to talk about drilling/plugging holes.
I suppose taking plugs out of holes and then spraying and plugging, one by one, helps ensure all bases are covered. It also helps to get the door latches, window regulators, etc lubricated and corrosion protected plus the electrical connections protected.

There are various OE plugs that give access to panels. How they treat over the rear wheel well without drilling is an interesting question to ask. That is an often missed area. Some remove the tail light assembly. Perhaps that's what they do. I have even removed the inside panel speaker on the 4th Generation.. As to the area to the front of the front door opening, a drilled hole is likely there.
 

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I have 2 choices.
A, move to Texas
B, I have a youtube channel I watch, guy is pretty good at fixing most anything ... mustie1
He makes up a mixture of chainsaw bar oil and paint thinner. The bar oil is thick and sticky, The thinner allows him to use a pump up garden sprayer and spray it under the car and hard to get to places. The thinner will evaporate in open air and only the oil is left. The whole chassis cost $20? to coat?

His procedure is to put the car on his hoist so he can walk under it. Cover the concrete floor, spray it & let thinner evaporate. Then he takes the vehicle down a dirt road and has fun and covers the fresh oil with dried up dirt & dust. Leaving a dry crust under the vehicle.
Just something that is not permanent, can be cleaned when work needs to be done, is cheap and easily re-applied as needed.

Not easy if you do not have a lift but something you can do at home as needed .... it will only slow down the rust not stop it if you live in the zone.
 

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There are drain holes in the doors, hatch, and rocker panels that can be used. I usually use those as well as any plugged holes, OE or otherwise, that give access. While I was doing the Jeep yesterday, I put the wand in the drain holes (two per side) for my 2016 DGC's rocker panels, and sprayed in all directions, just to add more product.

The Fluid Film process tends not to talk about drilling/plugging holes.
I suppose taking plugs out of holes and then spraying and plugging, one by one, helps ensure all bases are covered. It also helps to get the door latches, window regulators, etc lubricated and corrosion protected plus the electrical connections protected.

There are various OE plugs that give access to panels. How they treat over the rear wheel well without drilling is an interesting question to ask. That is an often missed area. Some remove the tail light assembly. Perhaps that's what they do. I have even removed the inside panel speaker on the 4th Generation.. As to the area to the front of the front door opening, a drilled hole is likely there.
 

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Yes Jeepman the guy that done my 2018 van took off my rear lights and blasted in there.
Do you think that would cover the wheel arch.
I was thinking about taking off that speaker panel and spraying in there.
I think it was you that I read it from.
I probably don’t need to do that now.👍
 

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An article in the Sept. 2018 issue of Consumer Reports says, basically, to skip the aftermarket undercoating/corrosion proofing. Others saying similar things are Car Talk, web2carz and Fox Business. I suspect if you absolutely, positively just feel like you have to part with your hard earned cash, shop around for someone who knows what they are doing and is willing to explain in detail the process they are going to use, and know that some of the materials used have to be reapplied periodically.

M
211008
 

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An article in the Sept. 2018 issue of Consumer Reports says, basically, to skip the aftermarket undercoating/corrosion proofing. Others saying similar things are Car Talk, web2carz and Fox Business. I suspect if you absolutely, positively just feel like you have to part with your hard earned cash, shop around for someone who knows what they are doing and is willing to explain in detail the process they are going to use, and know that some of the materials used have to be reapplied periodically.

M
211008

If I had listened to Consumer Reports I would never have bought the 2002 DGC Sport. It turned out to be the most dependable vehicle I ever owned. When sold in 2008, with 370,000 km, it still had its original front struts, water pump, engine, transmission, ac (without any recharging ever), radiator, heater boxes, rocker panels, etc., etc..

We are in a highly corrosive environment here. Besides the road salt we have the salt air from the ocean to contend with. A double whammy.

Anybody that dives their vehicle much and wants to keep it for a long time, will get corrosion protection here. The good products protect the electrical systems, also keep hoses from drying out as well as lubricate anything they come in contact with. It all works for the good including facilitating repair work. It's money well spent, whether one pays the Piper or does it themselves.

It's not only used on sedans, suvs and vans, it's used on 18 wheelers and dump trucks, snow plows, and farm equipment (fertilizer corrodes but maybe Farmers could continually wash their equipment instead - likely?).

These aren't the ivory towers here, these are the trenches, If one uses their vehicle and wants to retain its value and performance, they get corrosion protection, the complete job, not just the underbody.
 

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If I had listened to Consumer Reports I would never have bought the 2002 DGC Sport. It turned out to be the most dependable vehicle I ever owned. When sold in 2008, with 370,000 km, it still had its original front struts, water pump, engine, transmission, ac (without any recharging ever), radiator, heater boxes, rocker panels, etc., etc..

We are in a highly corrosive environment here. Besides the road salt we have the salt air from the ocean to contend with. A double whammy.

Anybody that dives their vehicle much and wants to keep it for a long time, will get corrosion protection here. The good products protect the electrical systems, also keep hoses from drying out as well as lubricate anything they come in contact with. It all works for the good including facilitating repair work. It's money well spent, whether one pays the Piper or does it themselves.

It's not only used on sedans, suvs and vans, it's used on 18 wheelers and dump trucks, snow plows, and farm equipment (fertilizer corrodes but maybe Farmers could continually wash their equipment instead - likely?).

These aren't the ivory towers here, these are the trenches, If one uses their vehicle and wants to retain its value and performance, they get corrosion protection, the complete job, not just the underbody.
 

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An article in the Sept. 2018 issue of Consumer Reports says, basically, to skip the aftermarket undercoating/corrosion proofing. Others saying similar things are Car Talk, web2carz and Fox Business. I suspect if you absolutely, positively just feel like you have to part with your hard earned cash, shop around for someone who knows what they are doing and is willing to explain in detail the process they are going to use, and know that some of the materials used have to be reapplied periodically.

M
211008
It depends on how long you plan to keep it and how much a little rust bothers you.

Factory rust protection has greatly improved over the years to the extent that aftermarket is probably a waste of money if you will keep it under 10 years. I have a 34 year old car that was treated with Ziebart, which was a good investment even though it has never seen winter.

And some aftermarket treatments are in the snake oil category. If the treatment is clear and invisible, chances are the treatment process involved just one step - putting a sticker on the inside of the windshield.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Just look for the plastic plugs in the door s and door sills which cover holes drilled for application. If there are no plugs, at most it might have undercoating.
It does have the plastic plugs all around the vehicle so we do know it's been rust protected. Just don't have any idea what they used in the past.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
It depends on how long you plan to keep it and how much a little rust bothers you.

Factory rust protection has greatly improved over the years to the extent that aftermarket is probably a waste of money if you will keep it under 10 years. I have a 34 year old car that was treated with Ziebart, which was a good investment even though it has never seen winter.

And some aftermarket treatments are in the snake oil category. If the treatment is clear and invisible, chances are the treatment process involved just one step - putting a sticker on the inside of the windshield.
What is your experience with Ziebart? I have a place near me that does Ziebart rust protection. Do you think it's worth checking into?
 

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What is your experience with Ziebart? I have a place near me that does Ziebart rust protection. Do you think it's worth checking into?
Run away from Ziebart as fast as you can. There is a good reason you hardly see any of these dealers anymore. That black stuff they put on dries out, cracks, and harbours moisture and salt and causes even more corrosion. I think they now flog a different product, but never mind, their reputation is in the negative range. If a used car has been Ziebart sprayed I won't even go look at it if I was looking for a used vehicle.

BTW, when Krown did my van they took the tail lights off and sprayed deep inside. That's on top of the usual wand into the drilled holes.
 

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The Canadian Automobile Protection Association has some interesting reading material. Here's one on corrosion protection (Rustproofing). Keep in mind that not all corrosion is "rust" (iron oxide). Copper wires can corrode, so can aluminum, plus materials can dry out/crack over time if not protected. Then there's wear and tear due to lack of lubrication. Products, the good ones anyway, that prevent corrosion, are also lubricants.


Tip: You can use Fluid Film on your leather boots.
 
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It does have the plastic plugs all around the vehicle so we do know it's been rust protected. Just don't have any idea what they used in the past.
I’ve got the plastic plugs all around my van.
I thought that’s how they came out of the factory ?
I bought mine last year it’s a 2018 model.and not to sure if the first owner sprayed it or not.
I’m spraying mine as I intend to keep this for a while.as I’m poor and can’t afford to change vehicles every year :D
 
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