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If you have a couple small vinyl plugs on your front door sills (top of rocker panel) and one in the vicinity of the front door latch, all the same size, then the vehicle has been sprayed with something.

There are OE plugs of assorted sizes as well, where product can be applied.
 

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What is your experience with Ziebart? I have a place near me that does Ziebart rust protection. Do you think it's worth checking into?
Run away from Ziebart as fast as you can. There is a good reason you hardly see any of these dealers anymore. That black stuff they put on dries out, cracks, and harbours moisture and salt and causes even more corrosion. I think they now flog a different product, but never mind, their reputation is in the negative range. If a used car has been Ziebart sprayed I won't even go look at it if I was looking for a used vehicle.
I've had very good experience with Ziebart. My parents had two new cars done in the 1970s and they lasted 20 years. They did have some surface rust in the end but no rust protection application will prevent that. I still have a 87 Chev that was done too and it isn't dried out at all. While the black stuff is messy when doing repairs, it's so much better than dealing with rusted bolts.

The comment that the black stuff dries out, holds moisture and causes more corrosion is nonsense. I've taken door panels off 15-20 years after Ziebarting, and the inside is still like new. In comparison, untreated 3 year old cars of same era were full of rust in the doors which would soon show on the outside.

Almost all rust protection dealers that specialize in treating new cars are gone, not just Ziebart. The reason is simple. Car makers only got serious about rust protection around the late 80s/early 90s. Before then, you could count on rust holes showing up within 3-5 years so aftermarket rust protection was common. But after galvanized steel bodies became the norm, aftermarket protection was much less necessary and the industry died. Companies like Crown are more intended for older cars. As I recall, Ziebart said at the time their rust protection was recommended for new cars only.

If you ever look at older cars that are in pristine condition, you will often find the Ziebart sticker on the glass.
 

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Ziebart Undercoating/Rust Protection? Should I?

Ziebart, nope, it hardens, doesn't continually creep, penetrate or lubricate.
Might work on a brand new vehicle if applied properly. That's a big "if". Sounds similar to Dealer applied product that costs hundreds of dollars. Dealer applied product usually has a third party warranty so they can give you the runaround.
 

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More on Ziebart
Ziebart Undercoating/Rust Protection? Should I?

Ziebart, nope, it hardens, doesn't continually creep, penetrate or lubricate.
Might work on a brand new vehicle if applied properly. That's a big "if". Sounds similar to Dealer applied product that costs hundreds of dollars. Dealer applied product usually has a third party warranty so they can give you the runaround.
Some good reviews and info there alright great linky.
It sure does reassure yourself that your making the right move👍
 

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Ziebart, nope, it hardens, doesn't continually creep, penetrate or lubricate.
Might work on a brand new vehicle if applied properly. That's a big "if". Sounds similar to Dealer applied product that costs hundreds of dollars. Dealer applied product usually has a third party warranty so they can give you the runaround.
So you used Ziebart and it failed? Do tell.

He is the underside of my Chev after 34 years. How much would it have cost to get it Krown sprayed every year for 34 years?
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Hood Synthetic rubber
 

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So you used Ziebart and it failed? Do tell.

He is the underside of my Chev after 34 years. How much would it have cost to get it Krown sprayed every year for 34 years?
View attachment 63766
If you didn't run it through the salt and slush, not much.
 
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I have personally witnessed Ziebart that looks alright on the surface. Scrape away some of the black stuff and you might be surprised what is underneath that you can't see. Totally up to you about Ziebart; I just know what I would avoid based on first-hand experience.

I think this is worth watching as Ziebart is specifically mentioned. Video is from my fav. YouTube repair channel and I respect Eric's opinion.

I'm sure he has seen way more cars than I have, first hand.

 

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I think this is worth watching as Ziebart is specifically mentioned. Video is from my fav. YouTube repair channel and I respect Eric's opinion.
Interesting. He says it has to be applied every year. That must be more recent because our cars were all a once and done application, so there is no build up like in the video. I went out and tried to scrape some off mine and couldn't. It's more like scratching paint.

But the thing is Ziebart worked really well back in the day when factory rust protection was almost non-existent. My parents had their 73 Plymouth done and it lasted for 22 years with well over 200k miles, with original paint and no body rust holes. The only rust through in the end was under the vinyl roof. In comparison, I bought a 72 Firebird in 78 for peanuts. It had already had extensive rust repair in the rear quarters and was starting to bubble again. I got 3 good years out of it.

New cars are a different story. They have extensive rust protection and as I said earlier, I wouldn't bother with additional rust protection unless I planned to keep it a long time (which I don't). In the video, his point about electrical connectors is a good one , but there aren't many connectors on older cars and they aren't anything like new cars (I changed a wheel speed sensor on my 2017 Journey last week and most of the time was spent trying to get at the connector and get it apart).

The only rust protection I now do on my newer cars is spray the brake lines with Krown or Fluid Film. Brake lines are probably the most vulnerable part underneath and you don't ever want a brake line leak (I've had a few over the years).
 

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Interesting. He says it has to be applied every year. That must be more recent because our cars were all a once and done application, so there is no build up like in the video. I went out and tried to scrape some off mine and couldn't. It's more like scratching paint.

But the thing is Ziebart worked really well back in the day when factory rust protection was almost non-existent. My parents had their 73 Plymouth done and it lasted for 22 years with well over 200k miles, with original paint and no body rust holes. The only rust through in the end was under the vinyl roof. In comparison, I bought a 72 Firebird in 78 for peanuts. It had already had extensive rust repair in the rear quarters and was starting to bubble again. I got 3 good years out of it.

New cars are a different story. They have extensive rust protection and as I said earlier, I wouldn't bother with additional rust protection unless I planned to keep it a long time (which I don't). In the video, his point about electrical connectors is a good one , but there aren't many connectors on older cars and they aren't anything like new cars (I changed a wheel speed sensor on my 2017 Journey last week and most of the time was spent trying to get at the connector and get it apart).

The only rust protection I now do on my newer cars is spray the brake lines with Krown or Fluid Film. Brake lines are probably the most vulnerable part underneath and you don't ever want a brake line leak (I've had a few over the years).
It’s obvious you have lots of dough to change your vehicles as you said your not gonna keep them .good on ya👍iwish I was well fixed like you .unfortunately not.maybe someday .opps sorry I’m now in my early sixties and gotta watch the old dosh 😂👍
 

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My parents had their '74 and '80 Dodge vans Ziebart'd when they were new, and they lasted quite a long time. I think we had the '80 van about 15 years before it was traded in, still was in great shape.
 

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It’s obvious you have lots of dough to change your vehicles as you said your not gonna keep them .good on ya👍iwish I was well fixed like you .unfortunately not.maybe someday .opps sorry I’m now in my early sixties and gotta watch the old dosh 😂👍
I don't have lots of dough and I'm the same age as you. I tend to keep cars at least 10 years, and sometimes 15-20 years, and for most cars the factory rust protection is good enough for that timeframe.

It seems DGCs have a weak point in the dog legs, but can be addressed without getting the whole van done.
 

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I don't have lots of dough and I'm the same age as you. I tend to keep cars at least 10 years, and sometimes 15-20 years, and for most cars the factory rust protection is good enough for that timeframe.

It seems DGCs have a weak point in the dog legs, but can be addressed without getting the whole van done.
Yeah all fine and Dandy if you have a garage or driveway .I don’t I live in the inner city and park in the street.
So taking it to a spray joint is much easier.👍
 

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Yeah all fine and Dandy if you have a garage or driveway .I don’t I live in the inner city and park in the street.
So taking it to a spray joint is much easier.👍
LOL, so you're the one with all the dough. I just go to Crappy Tire and buy a can of Fluid Film. Takes 2 minutes to spray the problem areas. I do it on the road so it doesn't drip on my driveway!
 

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LOL, so you're the one with all the dough. I just go to Crappy Tire and buy a can of Fluid Film. Takes 2 minutes to spray the problem areas. I do it on the road so it doesn't drip on my driveway!
I think your mistaking me with someone else.where did I say I have lots of dough?
I said I was poor maybe but not lots of dough.
Now perhaps you’ll understand why I get my van sprayed so it’ll last .
If I had lots of dough I wouldn’t even be on this forum talking about a minivan ffs.
Have yerself a nice weekend and chill out👍
 

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I think your mistaking me with someone else.where did I say I have lots of dough?
I said I was poor maybe but not lots of dough.
Now perhaps you’ll understand why I get my van sprayed so it’ll last .
If I had lots of dough I wouldn’t even be on this forum talking about a minivan ffs.
Have yerself a nice weekend and chill out👍🇨🇦
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Oilgard if in Ontario,the best around.
Krown never got into the nooks and crannies on my last visit .
Oil gard take of rear lights and gets in behind panels etc.
I got a half and half.
Meaning thinner oil in behind the panelling and thicker oil underneath.
Not to sure if they are in Toronto
I’m in Windsor Ontario 👍
I found an Oilguard near me but don't see a "Half and Half mixture"

 

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I only found out about the half and half on the windsors branch website when I was booking an appointment.
That’s when the owner told me what it was.$139.00 .
I also did researching about.this was voted Windsor’s number one.
There is two Krown dealers here also and rust check.
They all are are privately owned franchise.👍
Rectangle Font Screenshot Technology Parallel
 

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Interesting. He says it has to be applied every year. That must be more recent because our cars were all a once and done application, so there is no build up like in the video. I went out and tried to scrape some off mine and couldn't. It's more like scratching paint.

But the thing is Ziebart worked really well back in the day when factory rust protection was almost non-existent. My parents had their 73 Plymouth done and it lasted for 22 years with well over 200k miles, with original paint and no body rust holes. The only rust through in the end was under the vinyl roof. In comparison, I bought a 72 Firebird in 78 for peanuts. It had already had extensive rust repair in the rear quarters and was starting to bubble again. I got 3 good years out of it.

New cars are a different story. They have extensive rust protection and as I said earlier, I wouldn't bother with additional rust protection unless I planned to keep it a long time (which I don't). In the video, his point about electrical connectors is a good one , but there aren't many connectors on older cars and they aren't anything like new cars (I changed a wheel speed sensor on my 2017 Journey last week and most of the time was spent trying to get at the connector and get it apart).

The only rust protection I now do on my newer cars is spray the brake lines with Krown or Fluid Film. Brake lines are probably the most vulnerable part underneath and you don't ever want a brake line leak (I've had a few over the years).
My 06 caravan rear brake line popped this year over the rear crossbeam/axle thingy, looked like it corroded from the inside out.
I had sprayed the van underneath with different 'stuff' every few years,
when I told my buddy at the shop to do both rear lines he refused, said the other one looks good.
brakes were flushed every couple of years too,
 

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I just purchased a 2012 Chrysler Town and Country Touring - L and it's in very good condition. It appears to have had rust proofing done previously. I would like to have it rust proofed but there are so many different kinds available, Krown, Corrosion Free, Fluid Film. Rust Check, etc. etc.

Just wondering what you use and why you prefer the one you use?

Advice would be appreciated.
Like others, I like and have used Fluid Film, but have found a product that is very similar and is a bit thicker plus without the notorious bad odor of Fluid Film called Woolwax. I highly recommend it.
 
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