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Like others, I like and have used Fluid Film, but have found a product that is very similar and is a bit thicker plus without the notorious bad odor of Fluid Film called Woolwax. I highly recommend it.
I have been looking at that product from Welcome to kellsportproducts.com - Woolwax lanolin vehicle undercoating. Woolwax stops rust !. They use to sell Fluid Film. Apparently Woolwax is less expensive and a little heavier than Fluid Film. Fluid Film is way over priced in Canada, but the Distributor seems to have a strangle hold on the market for it unfortunately.

When I search for Woolwax in Canada, this is what I get:
We ship lanolin based Woolwax® to Canada every day. Average delivery is 5-7 days.
Stop overpaying for lanolin undercoating.
Woolwax® Stops Rust !

All the prices listed on our site includes all shipping costs, customs fees, and all of Canada taxes. You pay only the price that is listed (in $USD)
Shipping is free to almost all locations in Canada. Please keep in mind that we are shipping from the USA and all orders need to clear customs. Please expect delivery in about 5-8 business days. (sometimes more, sometimes less). If you are really in a hurry for the product, we have no way to expedite or guarantee a firm delivery date. Please give yourself enough time. We have arranged to "pre-clear" electronically all our shipments with Canada Customs and it works extremely well

Click here to join our Canada email list
I'm guessing you are associated with Woolwax.
 

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What do these rustproofing procedures cost? Obviously, still a very big part of the car culture in Canada. Here in the “rust belt” of Northeast Ohio almost no rustproofing shops still in business.
The peak rustproofing decades were the fifties, sixties, seventies, and into the eighties. As car manufacturers improved their use of galvanized metals and rustproofing technology the demand for rustproofing after purchasing the vehicle slowly faded away.
As I recall you usually had the car rustproofed and then came back every year (for a fee) for a touch up to keep the warranty in effect. Then once the car was paid off it was time to trade on a new one.
 

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Like others, I like and have used Fluid Film, but have found a product that is very similar and is a bit thicker plus without the notorious bad odor of Fluid Film called Woolwax. I highly recommend it.
I suggest watching this video particularly starting at the 9:40 time mark. He makes interesting comments about Woolwax.

 

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I'm not a fan of rust-proofing, most of it is largely useless, keeping the vehicle clean is more effective in the long run. Driving in salty conditions and then letting the vehicle sit covered in salt film for weeks, especially when it's above freezing, is what accelerates rust to rapid destruction. Greasy films tend to just collect dirt (and more salt) and make working on the vehicle miserable.
 

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I'm not a fan of rust-proofing, most of it is largely useless, keeping the vehicle clean is more effective in the long run. Driving in salty conditions and then letting the vehicle sit covered in salt film for weeks, especially when it's above freezing, is what accelerates rust to rapid destruction. Greasy films tend to just collect dirt (and more salt) and make working on the vehicle miserable.
I'm not a fan of rust-proofing, most of it is largely useless, keeping the vehicle clean is more effective in the long run. Driving in salty conditions and then letting the vehicle sit covered in salt film for weeks, especially when it's above freezing, is what accelerates rust to rapid destruction. Greasy films tend to just collect dirt (and more salt) and make working on the vehicle miserable.
:eek::eek::eek: Your brave lol👍
 

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I'm not a fan of rust-proofing, most of it is largely useless, keeping the vehicle clean is more effective in the long run. Driving in salty conditions and then letting the vehicle sit covered in salt film for weeks, especially when it's above freezing, is what accelerates rust to rapid destruction. Greasy films tend to just collect dirt (and more salt) and make working on the vehicle miserable.
Yes but the oily surfaces create a better slick stream for fuel economy plus make the vehicle easier to work on when removing fasteners. The metal contact surface lubrication and electrical protection of wires and connectors just add to the value. :)

Oh yes, and then there's the corrosion and added resale value protection. A win, win. :)
 

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Just a personal observation. Most vehicles i see (rust belt) have no signs of rust. Maybe, under body. The vehicles with obvious rust are all over ten years. My perspective comes from the sixties and seventies when you had to rust proof a car because in three years the fenders, rocker and quarter panels started to show rust. Rustproofed cars usually looked good. This was before galvanized metal was used.
I think rustproofing is a good idea for long term ownership. With car loans now beyond six years you want to keep the value. Decades ago a new $5,000 car might have a two or three year loan.
What is the cost for getting a car rustproofed?
 

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The 4th Generation was bad for rust:
  • in the rocker panels. Foam intrusions in there didn't help drainage. Drain holes plugged with sealant didn't either.
  • rear doglegs, especially on the Grands. Again, foam involved.
  • front fender at the bumper.
The body part suppliers made replacement sections for those areas to be welded in. Fiberglass worked, sort of, as well.

Rocker panels for the 5th Generation have plastic cladding to cover up the rust. Might want to check there as to what's happening.

I'm guessing the disappearance of any rust proofers was because:
  • poor application, people migrated to the better known firms, like Krown. The big names still exist and are progressing.
  • the mass destruction of serviceable vehicles, through buy out programs of previous years, cut into the business.
  • Dealerships over selling of packages with great promises. I know one person that had the electronic as well as spray system done by a Dealership on a new vehicle. That vehicle was recalled and supposedly scraped in about 9 years due to rear suspension rust out (2010 CRV). YES, vehicles still have rust problems, don't hide your head in the sand (or salt) on that one.
Cost = about $140.00 for van, for a complete job (less than an hour), likely half that for just the under body.
Doing it yourself, with a compressor and spray equipment, less than $50.00.

The Honda CRV recall for those that don't think vehicles rust anymore, and what their remedial action was.
Two questions about what the Honda CR-V corrosion recall means to owners
I can answer both questions here. Honda Canada recently issued a recall on the 2007 through 2011 model-year CR-V for a rusting problem that could result in a rear suspension control arm separating from the vehicle. The recall applies to vehicles in all provinces from Ontario east, which experience heavy road salt usage and humid operating environments. Dealers were instructed to inspect the rear frame stiffeners and to apply corrosion protection (nothing about washing daily there. :)). When a vehicle does not pass the inspection, Honda will offer to repurchase it.

Honda dealers were instructed to test the rear chassis stiffener of recalled vehicles. If they are able to perforate the metal using a testing tool (it’s a special mallet with a spike attached) then the vehicle “fails” and the first remedy offered is a buyback. I believe the buyback is a non-negotiable value plus a 15% markup for any inconvenience. Generally, a repurchase offer based on a standard formula benefits the owners of vehicles in rough condition and is less advantageous to owners of vehicles in good condition, or with low mileage.

Honda’s recall does allow for the repair of vehicles that owners would prefer to keep. However, this appears to be a tertiary remedy to be suggested after either rustproofing has been applied or a customer turned down the buyback offer.
For those of you that think you live in the rust belt we, in Eastern Canada, live in the MOTHER of rust belts and are dealing with it through corrosion protection. Leave us alone. :)
 

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It can be less expensive. Krown, and others, have promotions like $15.00 to $20.00 off plus a free spray can of T40 and a wash . The place I go to gives a CAA discount too.
 
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The 4th Generation was bad for rust:
  • in the rocker panels. Foam intrusions in there didn't help drainage. Drain holes plugged with sealant didn't either.
  • rear doglegs, especially on the Grands. Again, foam involved.
  • front fender at the bumper.
The body part suppliers made replacement sections for those areas to be welded in. Fiberglass worked, sort of, as well.

Rocker panels for the 5th Generation have plastic cladding to cover up the rust. Might want to check there as to what's happening.

I'm guessing the disappearance of any rust proofers was because:
  • poor application, people migrated to the better known firms, like Krown. The big names still exist and are progressing.
  • the mass destruction of serviceable vehicles, through buy out programs of previous years, cut into the business.
  • Dealerships over selling of packages with great promises. I know one person that had the electronic as well as spray system done by a Dealership on a new vehicle. That vehicle was recalled and supposedly scraped in about 9 years due to rear suspension rust out (2010 CRV). YES, vehicles still have rust problems, don't hide your head in the sand (or salt) on that one.
Cost = about $140.00 for van, for a complete job (less than an hour), likely half that for just the under body.
Doing it yourself, with a compressor and spray equipment, less than $50.00.

The Honda CRV recall for those that don't think vehicles rust anymore, and what their remedial action was.
Two questions about what the Honda CR-V corrosion recall means to owners


For those of you that think you live in the rust belt we, in Eastern Canada, live in the MOTHER of rust belts and are dealing with it through corrosion protection. Leave us alone. :)

It would be cool if we could know where everyone that posts is located, then we'd really know which "rust belt" (more accurately "salt belt") is local to them.
 

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Northeast Ohio is known as the “rust belt” In Ohio. Heavy snowfall in winter from prevailing winds off Lake Erie. Also rise in elevation. Foothills of the Appalachian mountains.
 

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CAA in southern Ontario typically offer $10 off your Krown rustproofing treatment. They (CAA/Krown) used to promote a scratch and save card once a year, with a minimum saving of $25 off your bill, but now it seems Krown alone is offering this deal in the June/July timeframe. For my van, it costs me just a hair under $130 all in; that's netting out the $25, and includes the 13% HST. They also throw in a spray can of Krown. I'm 5 years into this 2016 van, and so far no visible signs of rust, but who knows what lurks underneath! I intend to drive this van into the ground, so having it run well without sporting rust is my motivation. The sales manager at the dealership was of the belief that the electronic device they sold was better than annual oil treatment - that dropped my regard of his knowledge/customer first sensibility a significant notch. If he truly believes that, well, he's entitled to that belief, but I'll stick to Krown. There's a product called Corrosion Free that is reported as good as Krown, and supposedly some parts of the CAF are using, but their dealer network is largely via Canadian Tire - and CTC have a very bad reputation. My rust belt is eastern Ontario, just 45 minutes west of Kingston, Ontario. In the winter, salt is de rigueur, or beet juice.
 
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