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Discussion Starter #1
Currently have an 05 Limited and its been an amazing vehicle. Looking to upgrade to something affordable with the same high end options. I see 2012 thru 2016 but should I pay a bit more for something newer?
 

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Currently have an 05 Limited and its been an amazing vehicle. Looking to upgrade to something affordable with the same high end options. I see 2012 thru 2016 but should I pay a bit more for something newer?
2016 is the last year for the T&C. That year should work fine.

My 2016 DGC Crew Plus is good. Pretty much the same up until 2018, at which time they dropped the body side mouldings.
 
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This is really a loaded question.
The 4th gens are generally bulletproof and trouble free.
The 5th gens however require proper maintenance to stay reliable.
The case of which, if you buy the wrong one, it may be a serious downgrade.

I'd personally stick with the 4th gen as it's a more solid vehicle than the 5th gens.
 

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Buy the newest one you can afford.

Once you buy a 5 Gen (2011+), you will not likev your 4 Gen. anymore.

i owned a couple of 4 Gen and a couple of 5 Gen. No problems whatsoever with any of them.

Only maintenance on all of them was oil changes.

Replaced AC compressor twice on my 2006.

Lot of miles pulling trailers.

Good luck.
 

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1997 Plymouth Grand Voyager Rallye
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Of course, 1997 was the best year. Was there ever any doubt about this?
 

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This is really a loaded question.
The 4th gens are generally bulletproof and trouble free.
The 5th gens however require proper maintenance to stay reliable.
The case of which, if you buy the wrong one, it may be a serious downgrade.

I'd personally stick with the 4th gen as it's a more solid vehicle than the 5th gens.
I disagree. Our 4th gen (07 3.8L) needed $100 in parts every couple weekends. Burned oil and clogged the cat in the process. Only a matter of time till the new one clogged. Dash LEDs kept burning out. Sliding door lock actuators failed. EGR failed. Alternator. Rear shocks. Etc. Rust was forming on the rear dog legs. It was 7 years old when we sold it.

Our '14, with ballpark similar mileage, has needed less attention. Rear shocks. Alternator. Thermostat. Oil filter adapter. Front struts. It goes better, stops better, turns better. It is holding up much better to corrosion.

IMO, getting a 5th gen is a no brainer. You can get more features, and I can't think of any 4th gen features that were lost.
 

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2008 Dodge GC SXT, 3.8L 2020 Dodge GC SXT Blacktop 3.6L 328 miles
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I have a 2008 Grand Caravan 3.8 L. Of course the brakes didn't last long. I did a brake job at 70,000 miles and at 152,000 miles. The only other thing that I would count as a liability was that the left front window regulator broke and then 1t 152,000 miles the ABS control module went bad. This wouldn't have been so bad except no rebuilt ones were available and I had to go to the dealer. This ended up costing $1068. I don't consider that very bad over 12 years. I wasn't a Dodge person when I bought it, but I just bought a 2020 GC.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
We had a 1995 loaded grand caravan and fell in love with the 2005 town and country as soon as we drove it. Will we love a 10 year newer more than the 05?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
What about the new Pacifica's? Anyone got opinions on those? I was told by a dealer partsman to stay away from early models.
I currently still own all vehicles in my sig. The 05 limited has been great and currently needs nothing. We don't drive a lot anymore but something super comfortable for long trips is important.
 

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haven't heard anything bad at all about the pacificas other than the fact that people actually somehow expect you to pay 20,000 for a used one with over 100,000 miles on it

i've seen some lemons, but lemons are lemons
 

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I would get rid of those two Ford trucks instead.
No, that's why he has two. One for parts, and one for driving.

I used to have two 97 Lincoln Town Cars, for this exact purpose. Everyday, something innocuous like a door handle or window motor would break, and I'd have a spare car to yank it off of...
 

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Regarding the comments suggesting a Gen4 van, if you live in the South, no problem, however, if you live in the salty North, the Gen 4 vans are heavily prone to rust, and lots of it. To illustrate this point, in late 2010 when our 2003 DGC ES was nearly 8 years old, it had rust so bad on both rear quarter panels and one of the front fenders you could nearly stick your whole fist through the hole; at the same time, our nearly 13 year old 1998 DGC Sport (with 70,000 more miles) only had some surface rust where some body work had been done and the rest of the body was perfectly rust free, including underneath and the infamous shock towers.
 

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Effective Corrosion protection makes all the difference in the world to a vehicle in the north, that gets much exposure to salted roads. The longer wheelbase 4th Generation models tend to rust more especially in the dog leg area.

By effective, I mean not the hyped up typical Dealer applied stuff, that's hit and miss as to application, or stuff sprayed on by Yahoos who don't understand the vehicle corrosion areas that need to be covered, inside and out. Rattlecan applications don't work that well either. For example, Dealership applications don't seem to cover the area over the rear wheels. Their applications are typically a waxoil which hardens, eventually cracks, and harbors rust.

My 2002 GC Sport was driven daily on the highway to and from work 30 min each way. When sold in 2018 it was in great shape. Rear axle and track bar were OE, so were the front struts and towers. No major body work.

The 2007 GC SXT is still going strong being fully treated with Fluid Film most every year. Has a few dents from colliding with a deer.

Anyway, back on track, I expect my 2016 GC to remain rust free with annual treatments of Krown or Fluid Film. Owners that complain about rusted vehicles haven't typically taken effective measures to prevent it from happening. I'm convinced, in most cases, It doesn't need to be.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
Our 2005 has zero rust or corrosion except for a bit on the wheels around the wheel weights. We don't drive it in the winter as we drive the old Plymouth Acclaim. It has rust and was repainted once. There's rust bubbling through the paint in places. The underside has no corrosion protection and its rusted up pretty bad. I had to replace a section of fuel line as it rusted out. Anyways not driving them in winter seems to be the solution to avoid rust and corrosion. Thanks everyone for the advice and comments. I love my old superduty diesels. Great power and affordable to fix.. plus they are easy to repair compared to these new diesels that require a ladder just to check the oil
 
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2014+ will have heavy duty brakes as standard equipment. Other than that and the different oil filter for the same years, there is no difference between 2011-2016(-2020 for Caravan).

Levy's a Chevy guy for the most part. That's why he's hating on the Fords. :p Them 7.3s are beasts.
 

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1997 Plymouth Grand Voyager Rallye
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Effective Corrosion protection makes all the difference in the world to a vehicle in the north, that gets much exposure to salted roads. The longer wheelbase 4th Generation models tend to rust more especially in the dog leg area.

By effective, I mean not the hyped up typical Dealer applied stuff, that's hit and miss as to application, or stuff sprayed on by Yahoos who don't understand the vehicle corrosion areas that need to be covered, inside and out. Rattlecan applications don't work that well either. For example, Dealership applications don't seem to cover the area over the rear wheels. Their applications are typically a waxoil which hardens, eventually cracks, and harbors rust.

My 2002 GC Sport was driven daily on the highway to and from work 30 min each way. When sold in 2018 it was in great shape. Rear axle and track bar were OE, so were the front struts and towers. No major body work.

The 2007 GC SXT is still going strong being fully treated with Fluid Film most every year. Has a few dents from colliding with a deer.

Anyway, back on track, I expect my 2016 GC to remain rust free with annual treatments of Krown or Fluid Film. Owners that complain about rusted vehicles haven't typically taken effective measures to prevent it from happening. I'm convinced, in most cases, It doesn't need to be.
You should open your own company to solve Snow Mexico's rust problems. Either the product or the service, or both
 
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Discussion Starter #19
2014+ will have heavy duty brakes as standard equipment. Other than that and the different oil filter for the same years, there is no difference between 2011-2016(-2020 for Caravan).

Levy's a Chevy guy for the most part. That's why he's hating on the Fords. :p Them 7.3s are beasts.
The 99 has superchips propane injection and edge programmer. It has 325rwhp setup for towing. It is very fun to drive an will seriously set you back in your seat when you floor it. I also have a second 2001 I acquired with a camper I purchased. Its a extended cab longbox in pristine condition also with 7.3. 2wd only though.. I love my old Ford diesels
 

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Never seen a tuned Ford diesel, but I have seen a few tuned Cummins Rams - all customer trucks. Had one that you had to let off the accelerator and hold the brake while letting out the clutch to keep from flying across the parking lot. Scared the crap out of me first time I drove it. No clue how that guy deals with parking lots. :p It jumped a good 5 feet forward with the clutch barely halfway out, and this was a 3500 dually with extended cab and bed and a fifth wheel setup, plus it had a full size bed toolbox loaded up too. Had to have been well over 7k lbs that it was throwing around like nothing.
 
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