The Chrysler Minivan Fan Club Forums banner
601 - 620 of 625 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
Well, most car washes inside gas stations do not have an underbody cycle... and the ones that have are costly... weekly washes would cost a fortune 😢
During the winter, that water would instantly freeze... the air blower does not blow the underbody.
Because snow spraying on the bottom of the van while driving it doesn't? Not sure what your point is here. Would you rather a little clean water freeze under your vehicle or a layer of salty/nastiness frozen under there.

And yes you're right, it is costly, but some $10-15 car washes every week is a **** of a lot cheaper than buying a new van or having it repaired due to rust because I was cheap.
 

·
Registered
2013 Dodge Grand Caravan SE 3600 V6 62TE Trans
Joined
·
20 Posts
The self car washes around me all have at least one bay that has an undercarriage wash in it. It's good to do it even in the warmer weather. Road construction tars and oil can stick to the bottom attracting a lot of stones and debris. Those stones can scratch the underside paint making a great place for winter road salt to attack the bottom of your car. During the warmer weather when I'm driving my van and drive thru construction areas I will take my van home and put it up on ramps and check for tar and oil. I WD40 the underside to get it off. It can make a real mess on my mud flaps, tires and wheels. Gotta get that stuff off too.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
29,090 Posts
Aren't the carwashes using recycled water, contaminated with salt?

A couple of car washes in my area have the gatling guns.



The under side of a vehicle doesn't tend to corrode that badly, gets washed by driving in the rain. The areas inside of rocker panel, door panels, hatch, doglegs, and over the rear wheel wells tend to be the places that corrosion happens in secret.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Miron

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,720 Posts
The under side of a vehicle doesn't tend to corrode that badly, gets washed by driving in the rain. The areas inside of rocker panel, door panels, hatch, doglegs, and over the rear wheel wells tend to be the places that corrosion happens in secret.
Exactly, the secret hidden traps causing the rust coming from inside out...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,720 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,720 Posts
And yes you're right, it is costly, but some $10-15 car washes every week is a **** of a lot cheaper than buying a new van or having it repaired due to rust because I was cheap.
I have to multiply that amount by at least 3 for each car wash... $50 weekly means $200 per month... too much for me!
Krown charges around $150 and you can do it once a year... and it would protect everything, not just the underbody. Anyway, these vans are notorious for rust after some years regardless of your efforts.
I saw just a few not rusted vans that were older but I believe they were repaired...

The van I have was painted/rustproofed by a company working for a Toyota dealership that sold me the van, I paid around $1,000 and they gave me 6 years warranty... it looks good after the first 2 winters... let's see :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: GCTruckster

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,720 Posts
Because snow spraying on the bottom of the van while driving it doesn't? Not sure what your point is here. Would you rather a little clean water freeze under your vehicle or a layer of salty/nastiness frozen under there.
Well, snow spraying cannot be avoided... otherwise, you are right... anyway, there is no place to do it for a reasonable price... I just wash the car after every harsh snowstorm using a touchless station to remove the salt away... luckily I have a garage at home and at work... so it never stays under a thick layer of ice and snow :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,720 Posts
Yes it does and it is kept warm and dry all winter.
This is a very rare situation... it is not relevant... I don't think too many people buy a minivan to keep it for summer driving only... Sport, antique or convertible cars may be used in the summer only but minivans? SUVs anyone? Just kidding :)

On the other hand... if it is not rusted, I am sure all the rubber parts are aging and might start falling apart... I believe it is not worth keeping a car with ultra-low mileage for so many years... its value is still low regardless of the mileage.
 

·
Registered
2013 Dodge Grand Caravan SE 3600 V6 62TE Trans
Joined
·
20 Posts
This is a very rare situation... it is not relevant... I don't think too many people buy a minivan to keep it for summer driving only... Sport, antique or convertible cars may be used in the summer only but minivans? SUVs anyone? Just kidding :)

On the other hand... if it is not rusted, I am sure all the rubber parts are aging and might start falling apart... I believe it is not worth keeping a car with ultra-low mileage for so many years... its value is still low regardless of the mileage.
I have to respectfully disagree with you there. With the crazy used car market being what it is right now, a very low mileage vehicle like mine is much sought after. I can get what I paid for it new if I wanted to sell it. But I don't want to sell it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
Well, snow spraying cannot be avoided... otherwise, you are right... anyway, there is no place to do it for a reasonable price... I just wash the car after every harsh snowstorm using a touchless station to remove the salt away... luckily I have a garage at home and at work... so it never stays under a thick layer of ice and snow :)
Point of interest: Garaging is actually terrible for accelerating rust as it increases the number of freeze/thaw cycles a vehicle sees. Salt doesn't do it's dirty work until it starts melting, so parking in a warm garage allows it to work much faster. The moisture build up on the floors due to temp changes accelerates this much further.

It's why "garage kept" vehicles are generally a rusted mess on the under carriage despite looking great outside.
 

·
Registered
2013 Dodge Grand Caravan SE 3600 V6 62TE Trans
Joined
·
20 Posts
Point of interest: Garaging is actually terrible for accelerating rust as it increases the number of freeze/thaw cycles a vehicle sees. Salt doesn't do it's dirty work until it starts melting, so parking in a warm garage allows it to work much faster. The moisture build up on the floors due to temp changes accelerates this much further.

It's why "garage kept" vehicles are generally a rusted mess on the under carriage despite looking great outside.
I hope none of that happens to mine. So far it's perfect all around without a spot of rust on the undercarriage. It never sees road salt so I hope that will help to extend her life for a couple more years. All the rubber gaskets and seals are okay. Keeping my fingers crossed but you never know.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
29,090 Posts
Heated garages tend to be the problem. More corrosion takes place when moisture is heated. Cold inhibits corrosion.

There are as many advantages as disadvantages when it comes to parking a car in the garage every day in winter. We recommend not heating the garage too much; an ambient temperature about five degrees Celsius will suffice in wintertime. In addition, making sure the area is well ventilated will allow our vehicle to dry up more quickly and reduce humidity.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GCTruckster

·
Registered
2013 Dodge Grand Caravan SE 3600 V6 62TE Trans
Joined
·
20 Posts
I had a Toyota Camry I left outside in my driveway for the winter. By the time I finished making the payments I had to get rid of it. It was pretty badly rotted. Road salt is the devil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,720 Posts
It's why "garage kept" vehicles are generally a rusted mess on the undercarriage despite looking great outside.
I never said that my garage is heated... I have around 5 to 10 degrees more than the outside temperature and without the wind effect... some times it is going under the freezing temperature and I totally agree with @Jeepman quotation:

There are as many advantages as disadvantages when it comes to parking a car in the garage every day in winter. We recommend not heating the garage too much; an ambient temperature of about five degrees Celsius will suffice in wintertime. In addition, making sure the area is well ventilated will allow our vehicle to dry up more quickly and reduce humidity.

My garage at home is ventilated because the van is away all day and at work, I am parking in an underground garage of a highrise which is not heated (10 degrees above outside temperature) and is very well ventilated to eliminate the exhaust gases of all the cars parked there.

But... every day, while I am at work or at home, all that stuff hanging from the underbody is melted/eliminated... I can see so many cars driving around for days with heavy snow hanging down there :(

A garage is so good for the battery and all the external rubber parts!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,720 Posts
I had a Toyota Camry I left outside in my driveway for the winter. By the time I finished making the payments I had to get rid of it. It was pretty badly rotted. Road salt is the devil.
Noooo, the manufacturer is the devil who is so happy to sell you a brand new overpriced but good looking car :mad:
For a small increase in the price, they could easily make our vehicles stay rust-free for many, many years but... who would buy new cars then?
 
  • Like
Reactions: regalboy63

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,720 Posts
I have to respectfully disagree with you there. With the crazy used car market being what it is right now, a very low mileage vehicle like mine is much sought after. I can get what I paid for it new if I wanted to sell it. But I don't want to sell it.
This is a temporary situation due to COVID but it is not going to last too long... I never buy new cars :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: regalboy63

·
Registered
Joined
·
520 Posts
All this talk about heated/non heated garages, washing regiments, when simple oil rustproofing like Krown, once a year solves pretty much all of these issues and the vehicle can be used all year round. I'm surprised so many still think it's snake oil, or think they are not needed because manufacturers assure their protection is sufficient.
They usually find out the hard way once it is too late, that salt does its thing quite covertly and once you see its works, it is usually too little too late.

Here is my, then 14 year old Mazda 3. I since sold it as I moved and work from home.
These are known to rust badly.

Tire Automotive tire Tread Wheel Synthetic rubber



Tire Land vehicle Car Wheel Vehicle
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
29,090 Posts
Yes, Mazdas took the rust out championship for years. Just ask any body shop. They had rental vehicles available to customers for long stinks while their Mazdas were off the road for rusted out suspension repairs.


Krown is a proven product, like many others. The application is key and Krown seems to have a good handle on that here. The guy that does my Van is actually an instructor for Krown as well. 25 years at the job says something. He works at a Shop and is a Mechanic at the same Shop when not Krowning.

Washing underneath, which gets washed amyway when driving through a puddle, doesn't do anything for inside of panel corrosion or protecting electrical wiring, connections, etc in the engine bay.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GCTruckster
601 - 620 of 625 Posts
Top