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Wrong side of COVID or politics? :)
Covid. They were downplaying any symptoms, as they did before the pandemic. Oh, a kid just has the sniffles - then a couple days later one of my kids would get a bad cold. They had a kid enrolled in dance classes and they wouldn't make her wear a mask there, and then would want to come over and not wear a mask in our house. Nope. We have immune compromised people in our house to protect. So they just stopped asking us for anything (which seemed to be the only time they would want to talk to us, when they needed something). Then when my son wanted to play with their son because they had been good friends, they wouldn't bring him over. That hurt my son a lot, so we had to cut ties with them. They were badmouthing us to some of the PCA's that still worked for us and them, and they were starting to believe it. That's when we told the PCAs to pay attention and see if they ever contacted them just to see how they were doing, not because they wanted something. That worked to get them to "see the light". Then when the pandemic got really bad and the county gave parents the option of either choosing a few dedicated PCAs or doing the care themselves and get paid for it, they opted to do it themselves for the extra money. They didn't care that one of their PCAs relied on that income. So she quit them and worked for us for a while. The pandemic made us realize the toxicity of that "friendship" and we have better friends now.

Back on track, about the plastic intake manifolds. GM had a problem with their 3.8L intake plenums melting because of the hot EGR gas entering. There was a metal shield that had to be incorporated into it to stop that. Some people were looking for the earlier aluminum plenums to replace the plastic ones with. Also, in case of a backfire would the plastic plenum blow apart? I blew the PCV hose off of mine once when I stopped cranking too quickly and the engine fired, backfiring through the intake. :eek: Smoke was coming from under the hood, and I was at a gas station and had just filled up. Luckily, no fire just smoke and a hose I had to put back on. :LOL:
 
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We have a pair of 2015s, a 2016, and a 2018 currently in my family.

My 2018 is over 100k currently. It's needed cooler lines and brakes.

One 2015 is over 430k miles. It's needed cooler lines a few times, 5 sets of brakes, a radiator, and a few suspension rebuilds. It's seen tons of SNG driving, heavy loads, and has towed a 3k lb trailer most of it's life.

The other 2015 is over 535k miles. It needed an oil cooler around 70k thanks to a quick lube. Brakes, suspension, cooler lines. It sees hard family use, is driven hard, and still keeps truckin
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The 2016 is over 435k miles. Cooler lines, suspension, brakes, radiator.

Thermostat/housing gets replaced with a Mopar unit every 100k when the cooling system is flushed, so it's a non issue. Other than the thermostats being replaced as regular maintenance like they should be, we have over 1.5 million miles of none of these being an issue.

That's on WI daily driven vans, so they see extreme heat and cold cycles regularly.
 

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2014 Ram C/V, black, delete seats, windows, factory hitch
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Had an acquaintance having trouble starting his jeep cherokee, sprayed some starting fluid in the airbox and the jeep backfired, blew the plastic intake apart like a bomb, shrapnel all over.
 

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The oil filter housing cracking is common to the 3.6 engine in most CJD engines. My 2014 Town and Country had the problem covered under the Max Care Life warranty otherwise $900 dealer fix.
The dealer oil change jockey did the damage at oil change and tire rotation time . He also over tightened wheel lug nuts. My vehicle has 136,000 Miles. No other component leaks.
 

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So they just stopped asking us for anything (which seemed to be the only time they would want to talk to us, when they needed something).
A friend in need is a friend indeed.

Maybe no posts on the aluminum oil coolers because they actually work? --- Then again, maybe not the chinese knock-offs.

Metal not high quality? Do you know the grade, or something else to make that determination? It's cast aluminum, and not much to do about quality of that except for the grade/where the metal caster gets it's ingots from. I worked in a plastic injection/die casting (zinc and aluminum) and secondary machining/testing shop for 6 years. Cast aluminum can still be porous and leak, but that's a result of gasses that can't escape the "mold" when being cast.
Are you saying that metal or a casting cannot be poor quality, but then list out all these quality issues that can occur?
If they Chinese can cut a cost out, like not using vacuum pumps or selling scrap parts, they will. I worked in high pressure aluminum casting also. It is challenging work.
 

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In the past 4 months I have replaced 3 of the 4 items in the OP's list, plus the starter! Just hit 105k miles on a 2011 T&C. The plastic Y coolant hose failed between Las Vegas and Mesquite Nevada at 11pm and I was stranded in the dark for several hours. Good times.
 

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My Y-hose assembly only recently failed on my 2013 T+C @ 340,000 miles. I replaced it with the Dorman that has the aluminum y-piece. The oil cooler failed somewhere in the 200k's, the dealer said it was due to over-tightening the oil filter housing. It was at Mopar so i don't know if they put in another plastic one or a metal one, i should find out. All else still going strong. Might do the thermostat/housing pre-emptively soon.
 

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GM had a problem with their 3.8L intake plenums melting because of the hot EGR gas entering. There was a metal shield that had to be incorporated into it to stop that. Some people were looking for the earlier aluminum plenums to replace the plastic ones with.
Ah, the L36 Buick-built 3.8L V6 engine that went into oodles of GM cars. The diameter of the metal EGR pipe that protrudes into the plastic upper intake was reduced starting in I think the 2000 model year, and definitely by the 2001 model year. That left more space between the EGR pipe and the plastic upper intake. Prior to the diameter reduction, the plastic surrounding the metal EGR pipe overheated and became brittle and cracked. The smaller diameter EGR pipe mostly fixed the problem by delaying the inevitable failure. My 2001 Grand Prix GT, for example, finally failed 20 years later with over 200,000 miles on it, but still did eventually fail. The Dorman replacement upper intake manifold has plastic in the area of the EGR pipe that is around three-times thicker than the OEM upper intake, so this is a really good example where the Dorman part exceeds the quality of the OEM. I can't say the same for the Dorman lower control arms for the same car. The rubber bushings tore apart within a few years, and I ultimately replaced the control arms with Moog CK-series arms with an improved bushing design. I also used Moog CK LCA's in my `11 Town & Country after a similar rubber bushing failure in replacement Mopar arms.

In the Series III model of the L36 engine, the upper intake manifold went back to being metal.

It's worth mentioning that the gasket in the lower intake manifold of the GM L36 engine also fails, and it makes sense to do both the upper and lower intakes if for any reason you have to do one, AND replace the OEM plastic coolant elbows with the aluminum Dorman replacements. (Another Dorman > OEM case.)
 

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We have a pair of 2015s, a 2016, and a 2018 currently in my family.

My 2018 is over 100k currently. It's needed cooler lines and brakes.

One 2015 is over 430k miles. It's needed cooler lines a few times, 5 sets of brakes, a radiator, and a few suspension rebuilds. It's seen tons of SNG driving, heavy loads, and has towed a 3k lb trailer most of it's life.

The other 2015 is over 535k miles. It needed an oil cooler around 70k thanks to a quick lube. Brakes, suspension, cooler lines. It sees hard family use, is driven hard, and still keeps truckin
.
The 2016 is over 435k miles. Cooler lines, suspension, brakes, radiator.

Thermostat/housing gets replaced with a Mopar unit every 100k when the cooling system is flushed, so it's a non issue. Other than the thermostats being replaced as regular maintenance like they should be, we have over 1.5 million miles of none of these being an issue.

That's on WI daily driven vans, so they see extreme heat and cold cycles regularly.
we should all make sure we are listening when you post car care advice…..
 

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we should all make sure we are listening when you post car care advice…..
Maintenance is key, which is the biggest thing EVERY owner of these vans neglects.

4-5k mile oil changes using only MS-6395 certified synthetic, a Mopar filter, and ensuring to use proper torque spec on the filter cap. That proper torque is key to not cracking the housing or tearing the o-rings inside. When it gets overtorqued, the o-rings tear or the housing cracks.

Transmission fluid every 30-50k using certified ATF+4 and a Mopar filter. This is just something for us that dates back to owning 1st and 2nd gens, they required 15-30k fluid/filter changes by the book to stay happy. They also ran the same fluid capacity, same fluid, and same basic filter design, so there's no reason to think the 62TE can somehow handle far more mileage.

Cooling flush with thermostat every 80-100k. This negates any thermostat issues and ensures your cooling system doesn't get gunked up.

Plugs/coils @60k using NGK plugs and MSD/Accel coils, then plugs every 80k after. The OEM Champion coils and Denso coils are subpar at best and tend to be lucky to make 60k before causing the "ghost miss" that everyone says is normal.

Inspecting/regreasing brakes every 15-20k. This keeps the calipers working properly and wards off premature brake wear.

Replacing belts/hoses every 100k, this also allows inspection of everything around them, such as the coolant Y everyone speaks of, although we've never personally had to replace them.

Inspect/grease suspension at each tire rotation (every 8k for us), this gives pre warning of most issues that may be coming up, we usually get around 100k on the original suspension, then around 120-150k on the greaseable replacements we use after.

PCV valve every 60k.

I'm sure I'm missing something, but this is the "top of my head" list of things we do regularly on all of our vehicles, not just these vans. It's also why we can have 3 of them well over 400k miles while other people are on their 2nd transmission under 100k....
 

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Replacing belts/hoses every 100k, this also allows inspection of everything around them, such as the coolant Y everyone speaks of, although we've never personally had to replace them.
I was under the impression, based on experiences here, that it wasn't a matter of if, but when. I guess I don't need to be so paranoid about them leaking anymore. :)

Anything you are doing that may make them last longer?
 

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Transmission fluid every 30-50k using certified ATF+4 and a Mopar filter. This is just something for us that dates back to owning 1st and 2nd gens, they required 15-30k fluid/filter changes by the book to stay happy. They also ran the same fluid capacity, same fluid, and same basic filter design, so there's no reason to think the 62TE can somehow handle far more mileage.
Not true. The very early generation minivans did not use ATF+4. They used an earlier version of ATF+. I don’t know much about ATF+2 but according to Chrysler anti-shudder properties of ATF+3 are usually degraded enough by 30,000 miles to cause noticeable shudder.

The goal in developing ATF+4 was to create a fluid that would match the performance characteristics of the current fluid (Type 7176D), but would retain those characteristics for at least 100,000 miles. Testing show that the friction coefficient of fresh ATF+3 and ATF+4 is essentially identical, but as the fluid ages ATF+4 retains the “as new” coefficient while ATF+3 degrades.
 

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Maintenance is key, which is the biggest thing EVERY owner of these vans neglects.

4-5k mile oil changes using only MS-6395 certified synthetic, a Mopar filter, and ensuring to use proper torque spec on the filter cap. That proper torque is key to not cracking the housing or tearing the o-rings inside. When it gets overtorqued, the o-rings tear or the housing cracks.

Transmission fluid every 30-50k using certified ATF+4 and a Mopar filter. This is just something for us that dates back to owning 1st and 2nd gens, they required 15-30k fluid/filter changes by the book to stay happy. They also ran the same fluid capacity, same fluid, and same basic filter design, so there's no reason to think the 62TE can somehow handle far more mileage.

Cooling flush with thermostat every 80-100k. This negates any thermostat issues and ensures your cooling system doesn't get gunked up.

Plugs/coils @60k using NGK plugs and MSD/Accel coils, then plugs every 80k after. The OEM Champion coils and Denso coils are subpar at best and tend to be lucky to make 60k before causing the "ghost miss" that everyone says is normal.

Inspecting/regreasing brakes every 15-20k. This keeps the calipers working properly and wards off premature brake wear.

Replacing belts/hoses every 100k, this also allows inspection of everything around them, such as the coolant Y everyone speaks of, although we've never personally had to replace them.

Inspect/grease suspension at each tire rotation (every 8k for us), this gives pre warning of most issues that may be coming up, we usually get around 100k on the original suspension, then around 120-150k on the greaseable replacements we use after.

PCV valve every 60k.

I'm sure I'm missing something, but this is the "top of my head" list of things we do regularly on all of our vehicles, not just these vans. It's also why we can have 3 of them well over 400k miles while other people are on their 2nd transmission under 100k....
Just like living to 98, doing all the right things in your life to prolong your physical health does not mean you will reach 98. Others reach it without doing anything special. There's the inescapable bell curve of life.
 

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I've never seen a thermostat housing damaged. It's often a failure in the coolant crossover that gets confused for a thermostat. The brass fittings that the thermostat bolts into have slid out and the crossover itself has warped from the heat.

Oil cooler was the longest lasting (aside from thermostat, which failed because of the element, not the body) on mine. It was removed right around 120k as preventative maintenance.

Ys failed around 50k, crossover at about 70k (though it may have been leaking a while before I noticed).
Your 2013 oil cooler was more robust than the new style that debuted in the 2014 model year
 
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