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Discussion Starter #1
I've had it. I want to know Why there are no class actions started re failed computers against Chrysler. Ive dumped $$$$$$ in my van only to be told "everyone" knows the computer fails and gives the xheck engine light on, causing we owners to run round trying to find out what the problems are, when the engineers all know the life of the computer is xXxX and then you have to buy a new one or get a new van. In my case there is no new computer. You have to buy a "rebuilt" one at $500 and hope it works. Personally I live on $800 a month. I can not buy a new car. Buying a old one, I buy problems. We as consumers should not put up with these kind of products. A suit should be started.
 

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You have a 18 Y.O. vehicle, serviced by an ignorant mechanic and still want to sue Chrysler?

The computer is doing it's job giving you a Check Engine Light.

You need to find a better mechanic instead.

Good luck.
 

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the vehicle is already way past what the engineers say the "life" of it is

these vans are very reliable, if you have a problem with a computer you have a problem with a computer

computer issues on these vans is not common, this is a more unusual problem and if the check engine light is on your concern should be what it's about, not that the computer is throwing it

i wouldn't try to blame and sue chrysler over the paint coming off my van, some things only last a certain time, i've yet to see any "engineered to fail" examples on these vans
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I ve had the check engine on for almost 8 years. I've taken the van to over 10 mechanics over the years. The reset computer always worked till the last two years, where to get it inspected I had to get a State wavier.
Everyone has said the same thing, not what you guys have said. Seems between the State guys, the dealer mechanics and the others they should be right. Having been trained to become a builder, in engineering classes, we ARE informed that the life use of metals is well known... that's is why so many items fail just after the warranry runs out. Sorry guys don't agree with you here.
 

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If your van is old enough to have the melted injector wiring harness issue, that could have killed the computer. An ignorant mechanic might see all the codes and think "replace the computer" and he would be wrong. The root cause needs to be found first, done with extensive diagnosing. Otherwise the computer will continue to be fried by a defective part hooked up to it.

Another of our family friends had the harness issue on their 2001 van. They had it to a mechanic with many years of experience (on older cars). He'd replaced so many things and still couldn't figure out the problem, and wanted to tear the engine apart because he thought it was deeper in the engine. The harness is on the top/outside of the engine and takes half an hour to replace. I researched the symptoms on this forum, learned of the harness issue, went to a junkyard and found/removed a harness for $5, installed it on their van and problem solved. I told them to tell their mechanic what the issue/part was and what years to look for it on, so he could help future customers better.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
In the years I've had the van, I've replaced tons of parts, fixed tons of broken items. Had axles replaced. It has rusted on the bottom so much the guiys have to be careful how to lift it. The doors had to be replaced, just yesterday one slider door fell OFF! The van has been a money pit. I would dread inspection time. It always ment hundreds of dollars to fix something. I drove a Dodge before this never had the kind of expense this has caused me. 4 more months and it's going to the recycle
 

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Discussion Starter #7
  • The wiring harness is visible on top and goes into a unit which is not a plus and "play" item. The power train modular is now the problem, the diagnostic was done. No interaction between it and O2 sensor. This item is also security protected and must be reprogrammed by the dealer, a Chrysler dealer. It's no longer for sale n the dealer refused to install one purchased from Napa. That they or rather if they could have it would have been a $900 job at min.
 

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"Everyone has said the same thing, not what you guys have said. Seems between the State guys, the dealer mechanics and the others they should be right."

Well then good luck.
 

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There's great information on this board that can help you. If the proper diagnostics were done, the wiring all checked out okay and PCM is indeed bad, it's absurd to have to pay $900 to replace it. I just had to replace mine a few weeks ago (my van has almost 350,000 miles on it) and I got a remanufactured unit on eBay that was fully programmed for $132 shipped. There are many companies that sell and/or repair them. It takes 15 minutes to install.
 

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I had an acquaintance who sold used car computers, and he told me that the vast, vast majority of computers, turned in as bad, were perfectly fine.

OP, you may actually have a bad computer, but it is probably the most reliable part on the car! Of note, was your car struck by lightning?
 

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There's great information on this board that can help you. If the proper diagnostics were done, the wiring all checked out okay and PCM is indeed bad.....
That is his problem, improper diagnosis. Computer keeps telling him something is wrong on the O2 sensor system, is not asking him to keep replacing the O2 sensor.

Sometimes is cheaper to take the vehicle to the dealer for proper diagnosis, at least no dealer would replace an O2 sensor six times. At least he should've saved the price of five O2 sensors to throw that money towards dealer labor.

Nothing seems to work, I've spent over $1100, and replaced the O2 6 times. Check engine light on, diagnostic points back to O2 sensor. Anyone here really know what to do. Don't say dump the van.:mad:
Recently happened to another member, he blamed the manufacturer for his lack of knowledge.

Who in his right mind will replace an O2 sensor (or any other part) six times and then blame the factory instead of blaming his mechanic?

Then ask why nobody has started a class action lawsuit on a 18 years old vehicle?

Why don't he try to start the class action lawsuit himself? Would love to see attorney's face when he try to explain him his facts.

Nothing seems to work, I've spent over $1100, and replaced the O2 6 times. Check engine light on, diagnostic points back to O2 sensor. Anyone here really know what to do. Don't say dump the van.:mad:
 

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To the OP of this thread. Do you know what the codes you are getting are? If not, do you know how to do the "key dance" to get them?

I had an acquaintance who sold used car computers, and he told me that the vast, vast majority of computers, turned in as bad, were perfectly fine.
In my case it was definitely the PCM. I didn't replace it until I checked all the other possibilities. I changed it and the codes never came back. I just passed my state inspection this morning.

Sometimes is cheaper to take the vehicle to the dealer for proper diagnosis, at least no dealer would replace an O2 sensor six times. At least he should've saved the price of five O2 sensors to throw that money towards dealer labor.
I think you make a good point, but overstate it some. Dealers aren't perfect. They don't always get the problem right either and charge an enormous amount of money.
 

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Dealers... I worked briefly at a GM dealership. One of the first jobs I got was to replace the cruise control module in a full size van. My votech training had me looking at the lights first, where I noticed a brake light was on when the regular lights were on. I pulled that light bulb and found the brake light filament crossed over to the taillight filament, making the cruise control think the brakes were applied and shutting out cruise function. I took the module back to the parts dept. and asked for a taillight bulb instead. Service manager couldn't believe it (nice guy, but kind of an idiot). $2 fix instead of $200 fix, and dealership didn't make the money they thought they would on that job. I quit after a week and went into manufacturing for a while. Proper diagnostics is everything.

That said, the van sounds like it is too rusty anyway to be safe, so better off replacing it. Sometimes it is better to let it go. My van needs a transmission computer for my swap, but not because it failed. The housing is too far corroded away! Hoping I can find another computer with a solid case and just swap out the guts. Then I will clear-coat paint it/seal it before installing, to protect it from the road salt.
 

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We as consumers should not put up with these kind of products. A suit should be started.
There are specific "lemon laws" on the books in our state. They apply to both new and used vehicles.
If you bought a problem vehicle, you should address it with the seller - time is of the essence, if you can comply with lemon requirements you stand much better chances of favorable resolution.
To file a class action, one first needs to get a judge to approve a "class"... (this and the rest of it is beyond the scope of this sub-forum)

As for your current problem if you lay out the specific malfunction details, many members would be willing to assist you.
 

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My 2001 also has electrical issues. It probably is a computer problem. If i take it to a mechanics shop, the price per hour is $100 to 150 dollars. Since it takes a long time to find and fix the problems and it soon exceedes the value of the van even before you include the parts. One of the highest rated shops in town refuses to work on electrical smog issues ecause they are complex and time consuming. Chrysler has a great idea but they forgot to put some quality control in their products. They must not want new customers. The moral of the story is stay away from chrysler products.
 

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If only this were simpler times of the horse and buggy. I'm sure even then someone would complain about horse shoes not lasting long enough or that the horse only lasts x amount of years before a leg breaks. Older vehicles have older vehicle problems. Nothing lasts forever. The elctronics are submitted to heat, cold, bumps, water, snow, whatever else they may come in contact with. Things corrode, wires break, stuff happens.
 

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My 2001 also has electrical issues. It probably is a computer problem. If i take it to a mechanics shop, the price per hour is $100 to 150 dollars. Since it takes a long time to find and fix the problems and it soon exceedes the value of the van even before you include the parts. One of the highest rated shops in town refuses to work on electrical smog issues ecause they are complex and time consuming. Chrysler has a great idea but they forgot to put some quality control in their products. They must not want new customers. The moral of the story is stay away from chrysler products.
Take a look at car complaints here: https://www.carcomplaints.com/

Electrical and other problems are shared pretty well among various manufacturers, including CR favs, Toyota and Honda.
 
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