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I was just at a tire place getting our tires rotated. After, they told us 3 of them have 4/32 tread left. One is a newer tire that replaced on8e that went flat and has 8/32. The problem is that these tires were new in March 2018, and only have about 17K miles on them. The original tires went 45K miles. I drove the originals hard, and went through so much more than the replacements (Goodyear Assurance). The alignment is fine. I rotated them faithfully. I don't get why they have worn so quickly. I never liked these tires, but that can't be the reason :) They were purchased because we didn't have enough for better tires at the time. It wasn't worth going cheaper.

We will be replacing them with, most likely, the General Altimax RT43s soon. Those were the best tires we had onour 4th Generation DGC, so we hope to have the same experience on this van.
 

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The problem is that these tires were new in March 2018, and only have about 17K miles on them. The original tires went 45K miles. I drove the originals hard, and went through so much more than the replacements (Goodyear Assurance).

My 2017 DGC still have the original tires, a little bit over 100,000 miles, still have good thread on them. Nitrogen filled, if that matters.

Something is wrong with your vehicle.
 

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Assuming alignment is okay and stable, tire wear can be caused by:
  • low air pressure (wear on inner and outer tire edge)
  • high air pressure (wear in center)
  • hard cornering, mostly left hand turns (wear on outside edge)
Keeping tabs on air pressure, to get even wear across the tire, is just as important as regular rotation. I tend to run a couple psi (38 psi vs 36 psi) higher than the door placard calls for. Sometimes that has to be cut back, especially for lighter weight tires.

Check the Tire Rack reviews on those tires to see what others are experiencing:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I would get another opinion. Those are good tires and rated for 80k miles.
I will probably do that. The tread looks deeper than 4/32 to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My 2017 DGC still have the original tires, a little bit over 100,000 miles, still have good thread on them. Nitrogen filled, if that matters.

Something is wrong with your vehicle.
That is the question. What is wrong? What could it be? I get everything checked more often than any car I have ever owned. I keep them aligned, I rotate them on schedule, and check the pressure monthly at a minimum. What is wrong?

The original Kumhos lasted reasonably long enough to me at 45K miles. I could not see them going 100K. Same with these Goodyear tires. I never expected them to go 80K, but 17K is silly. I have never seen tires go as long as advertised. How did you get 100K?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Assuming alignment is okay and stable, tire wear can be caused by:
  • low air pressure (wear on inner and outer tire edge)
  • high air pressure (wear in center)
  • hard cornering, mostly left hand turns (wear on outside edge)
Keeping tabs on air pressure, to get even wear across the tire, is just as important as regular rotation. I tend to run a couple psi (38 psi vs 36 psi) higher than the door placard calls for. Sometimes that has to be cut back, especially for lighter weight tires.

Check the Tire Rack reviews on those tires to see what others are experiencing:
I don't do hard cornering much so I don't see that being it. Since I have disabilities, I always ask the tire place to check the air and fill them. They always do it to the amount on the door sticker which I think is 36. I don't know if they will do 38 at my request.

Checked the reviews and one had to replace theirs after 15 to 20K too. We haven't replaced ours yet though.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Right. It was cold so I didn't get to check all three completely. The parts I could see and feel were deeper than that. However, I couldn't check the inner side. Will check more tomorrow.
 

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Maybe the tire guy took readings on the wear bars, not knowing what he was doing, or could have taken readings on the edges. A second look is valid.

Pressure readings are suppose to be taken in early morning prior to any sun getting at the tires or any driving is done. Both those conditions raise the pressure by about 1 psi for each 10F degrees.

I would guess you have edge wear due to air pressure, even when adjusted, being on the low side.

One thing in your favor is that, as tires get worn down, the rubber becomes harder and they wear for much longer because of that. They also lose some wet traction and gain some dry traction.
 

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Which Goodyear Assurance tires, as there are a few models of them to choose from? That could be the difference, a cheaper model. Glad you posted a general location in you profile, because if you were down south I would say that wear is normal. The heat down there eats tires quickly.

I agree with Jeepman, and run my tires a couple of pounds over spec. I used to run front at 44 and rear at 40 on my 3rd gen, but the center of the front right tire wore close to bald. Now it's 40 front and 36 rear. Does a lot better.

The 5th gen van is heavy, so they eat tires like the Toyota Sienna is known to do (have a 2011). The edges get worn off because the tires are too light duty/run close to maximum weight specs for the tire. Some choose to run light truck tires with a stiffer sidewall and that helps a great deal, but you will sacrifice some comfort.

We needed new tires for our Sienna last summer and I found a good used pair of the Altimax RT43's in the junkyard, so used those on the front for a month. They went through torrential downpours of rain without much trouble on the freeway. I was impressed. I had been shopping for new tires, doing research and had been considering the Goodyear Assurance Comfortread Touring, but happened upon the Generals instead. After that one month test drive I bought two brand new ones for the front, and moved the used fronts to the rear. I bought another nearly new one off craigslist for $80 this fall with only 50 miles on it, so one more new one and I'll have an all new set. I'll keep the old used ones for spares.

I also moved up in size compared to the van specs (to 235/65r17) because the tire in that size had more load capacity than the same tire in factory size (to help with premature wear). I swap to dedicated snow tires (on rims already) in the winter, so the summer tires don't get the miles racked up on them so quickly. The deep tread of the RT43's makes them safer if I don't get the wheels swapped right away (like this year) and my wife has to drive in the snow for a few days before I get to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The tires are the plain old Assurance All seasons. No fancy names added after Assurance.
 

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That is the question. What is wrong? What could it be?
I have never seen tires go as long as advertised. How did you get 100K?
I don't know.

Maybe 99% of the time I'm on the highway, long trips.

Maybe using nitrogen helps too.

Seems like my tires still have some 20,000 miles of life left.

I'll take a picture when I get to my destination, that would be tomorrow around noon.
 

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I don't know.

Maybe 99% of the time I'm on the highway, long trips.

Maybe using nitrogen helps too.

Seems like my tires still have some 20,000 miles of life left.

I'll take a picture when I get to my destination, that would be tomorrow around noon.
Here's wishing you a flat tire free trip.
 

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Maybe using nitrogen helps too.
Nitrogen only helps a tiny bit if you are losing air and never check the pressure. Otherwise, it makes absolutely no difference when tires are properly inflated.

As an engineer, I have to say paying for nitrogen for car tires is a complete waste of money. Regular air is 78% nitrogen anyway. Nitrogen is used in aircraft tires because of the huge temperature swings they experience in just seconds. It is also used in auto racing for pressure consistency at very high temperatures. The benefits to a car in everyday driving are trivial.

The selling tactics for nitrogen are shameful. They say nitrogen doesn't leak like plain air does. If that was true, then the non-nitrogen part of the plain air would leak out, while the nitrogen part wouldn't, and after a while your plain air filled tires would have almost pure nitrogen anyway.
 

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Nitrogen only helps a tiny bit if you are losing air and never check the pressure. Otherwise, it makes absolutely no difference when tires are properly inflated.

As an engineer, I have to say paying for nitrogen for car tires is a complete waste of money. Regular air is 78% nitrogen anyway. Nitrogen is used in aircraft tires because of the huge temperature swings they experience in just seconds. It is also used in auto racing for pressure consistency at very high temperatures. The benefits to a car in everyday driving are trivial.

The selling tactics for nitrogen are shameful. They say nitrogen doesn't leak like plain air does. If that was true, then the non-nitrogen part of the plain air would leak out, while the nitrogen part wouldn't, and after a while your plain air filled tires would have almost pure nitrogen anyway.
Oh, oh.

WARNING: LEVY is a nitrogen salesperson, has a big nitrogen generator, and is very defensive about the product. Personally, I like the green valve caps.

Tires are pretty airtight these days. Winter wheels don't lose much air over the summer storage season.

My first experience with nitrogen in my tires was disappointing. Without researching the topic, I was oversold on it. Overselling is the key word, I think, sort of like "quasi" synthetic oil, 80% of such oil is a petroleum product. :)

Did I really say that?

Oh, oh
 

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Nitrogen only helps a tiny bit if you are losing air and never check the pressure. Otherwise, it makes absolutely no difference when tires are properly inflated.

As an engineer, I have to say paying for nitrogen for car tires is a complete waste of money. Regular air is 78% nitrogen anyway. Nitrogen is used in aircraft tires because of the huge temperature swings they experience in just seconds. It is also used in auto racing for pressure consistency at very high temperatures. The benefits to a car in everyday driving are trivial.

The selling tactics for nitrogen are shameful. They say nitrogen doesn't leak like plain air does. If that was true, then the non-nitrogen part of the plain air would leak out, while the nitrogen part wouldn't, and after a while your plain air filled tires would have almost pure nitrogen anyway.
As a mechanical engineer, I can tell you, Nitrogen helps more than that.

Good nitrogen source should provide "dry nitrogen". Using dry nitrogen also helps to keep more estable pressure. Waterbin the air vaporize with temperature changes.

Now if I still have safe tires after 100,000 miles, then something is helping, I don't know what.

I do have my own nitrogen generator, so it cost me nothing to fill my tires anytime I feel like it.

I use nitrogen even on my lawn tractors.

You don't see airplane tires filled with plain air, has to be a good reason.
 

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As a mechanical engineer, I can tell you, Nitrogen helps more than that.

Good nitrogen source should provide "dry nitrogen". Using dry nitrogen also helps to keep more estable pressure. Waterbin the air vaporize with temperature changes.

Now if I still have safe tires after 100,000 miles, then something is helping, I don't know what.

I do have my own nitrogen generator, so it cost me nothing to fill my tires anytime I feel like it.

I use nitrogen even on my lawn tractors.

You don't see airplane tires filled with plain air, has to be a good reason.
Great, so you know the equation PV=nRT. From that, a tire inflated to 36 psi contains one volume of atmospheric air (78% nitrogen) and 2.45 volumes of 100% nitrogen. That gives an overall nitrogen content of 93.6%.

Yes there are benefits, but they are minimal. Should You Fill Your Car's Tires With Nitrogen? | Edmunds This is just one example but the consensus is pretty clear. Since you have your own generator, you get more benefit, but that wouldn't apply to the vast majority.

Airplane tires are a totally different situation. They get extremely cold in flight (as low as -70 degrees F), and then heat up extremely quickly on landing, to as much as 800 degrees F.

I have had tires last to (and a bit beyond) 100k miles, and that's on a full size RWD Chevs. But I generally change tires before I need to because of age, or to just get more use out of new tires. If I am planning on keeping a car 5 more years and the tires are good for 2 more years, I'll get new tires now. It would be dumb to squeeze every bit of life out of the old tires and then get rid of the car in a few years with nearly new tires.

Cheers!
 
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