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Drum brakes = yes. Disk brakes = maybe, if checking for more than wear, like stuck pins or torn boots. Uneven wear, if detected, would lead some Mechanics to look further. Some may ever create a fuss about rust on the brake lines, it all depends on how concerned the Mechanic is about safety or being audited. Front wheels don't come off very often, more like never, in my experience with safety inspections.

Vehicles, that have passed safety inspection at one shop, say a Dealership, have been looked at by another shop, for whatever reason, and written up or rejected because of a perceived safety problem. The vehicle Owner, of course, gets very upset and may even go public/legal.
Perhaps it wasn鈥檛 even the mechanic that safetied the van who last put the wheels on.
A well that鈥檚 water under the bridge.happy thanksgiving馃憤馃嚚馃嚘
 

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NY requires two wheels off now, (one wheel previous to 2020) even have cameras to make sure its done according to my garages. I like the steel wheels, a good wire brushing on the rims cleans them up nice, then I paint on a heavy coat of black rustoleum (better if the can is old and it has started to stiffen up), let it flow out nice and even. I do that every 4-5 years, no issues. We have lots of gravel roads and the paved ones have 5-6" deep potholes in them pretty much all year, it really beats up the alloy rims, and they have to be bent back every year, some are unusable after. Steel seems to hold up better and is cheaper to replace anyway. I run Cooper Mud/Snows with an aggressive tread all year on all four. A little noisy in 90 degree summers but perfect all the rest of the year. Oh, and I always use neverseev on my lug studs, never had any issues and never had a stuck lug nut. Been doing that for 40 years on many cars. In architectural building with steel, we use lubricated nuts and bolts, there are two torque requirements depending on whether the bolt is oiled or not, many are required to be. Its hard to stretch a stud by hand (the guns may do it tho), unless you have an old school mopar with left hand threads, I did do it a few times then.
 

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I鈥檓 led to believe the wheels have to come off to check the brakes?.
I鈥檓 just stating what he told me馃憤
Not in Texas. They just inspect what they can see, then "some"' drive the vehicle around the block to check brakes and suspension.

Some shady shops might just to try to make more money.

Safety inspection cost in Texas is $7.00 for the shop, not enough to remove even one wheel.

Would you remove all wheels-drums and perform all other inspections for that price?

Few years ago, safety inspection included checking the headlights to make sure liggts were correctly aimed, not anymore, the state found out everybody failed that test and everybody had to pay the shop to fix it.

In Texas, only 17 out of 254 counties do emissions testing.
 

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I like the steel wheels, a good wire brushing on the rims cleans them up nice, then I paint on a heavy coat of black rustoleum (better if the can is old and it has started to stiffen up), let it flow out nice and even. I do that every 4-5 years, no issues.
Oh, and I always use neverseev on my lug studs, never had any issues and never had a stuck lug nut. Been doing that for 40 years on many cars.
Do you mask off the tire, valve stem, stud hole contact areas and mating surface? use a brush?

40 years is a good test of time? Must be doing something right. :)
 

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Do you mask off the tire, valve stem, stud hole contact areas and mating surface? use a brush?

40 years is a good test of time? Must be doing something right. :)
Yes, Yes I did, especially around the valve stem. Yes it takes a bit of time, but you only do it every 4-5 years, not a big deal.
 

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Like others have said, I prefer steelies for winter tires. Inexpensive, they work just fine, and they're going to get muddy and nasty driving around in the snow anyway. Easy enough to clean up and refresh yourself every few years if the salt starts getting to them. If you just can't stand the look of those, I guess it would be up to your aesthetic preferences what you want to run.

Not sure if you have them in Canada, but I am a huge fan of Cooper Weather-Master snow tires. I've put them on a number of different vehicles, all with outstanding results. They are a studdable tire; I prefer to run studs in the winter because a lot of the streets around here are not plowed regularly, and the snow is quickly packed down to pretty much solid ice. That's where studs make a difference. For non-packed snow and slush it's the tread pattern & rubber formulation that make snow tires better than summer tires, and you probably don't need studs if that's what you're mostly dealing with. The trade-off to studs is less grip and stopping ability on clear pavement, and I have had one or two close calls that probably would have been a little less hairy if the tires weren't studded.

Plusses and minuses, like everything in life.
 

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Ordered the Continental WinterContact tires yesterday from Canadian Tire online. Got notification that the order had been received, was being processed and to wait for an email saying the tires were ready to pick up.
About 3 hours later got an email saying my order was cancelled because of "issues with your order". Guess I shouldn't have filled out the survey at the end of the order although I can't remember swearing or being negative about their web site. :) My account seems to be fine, not over drawn, in arrears, or anything. I will call them on Tuesday.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone. If you see any Pilgrims, be nice to them.
Reordered the 225/65 R17 Continental WinterContact tires on Tuesday and they are now ready to pick up, $778.00 later.

The computer systems at Canadian Tire must have taken a turkey break on Sunday. :)
 

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I could use some winter tire advice. I will be purchasing winter tires for my new to me 2012 Chrysler Town and Country Touring-L. I also want to buy decent looking rims as well. I hate those awful looking steel rims that rust and look like crap. Could I get some suggestions as to a good winter tire and where is a good place to buy the rims? Also if I get new rims what happens with the TPMS?

I am looking at some tires at Canadian Tire that are on special right now. They are the Bridgestone Blizzak WS90 or the Michelin X-Ice snow and also wondering if checking with the junkyards to see if they have some decent rims that come off a 2012 Chrysler Town and Country.

Would appreciate any advice you can offer.
Two years ago I purchased 4 Goodyear Winter Command tires for my 2013 Grand Caravan that I used driving for Uber in the Salt Lake City area. I needed snow tires to be able to carry Uber Ski passengers up to Park City and the surrounding areas. I was truly impressed with the smooth and quiet ride of those tires in addition to their handling prowess. The highway to Park City is fast, winding, pretty steep, and at times has some curves that can be very challenging to drivers not on their toes or vehicles not capable of handling high speeds curves. Typical fast lane uphill traffic travels around 80-85 MPH and often has to weave around slower vehicles to maintain that pace; it is a fun to road to drive quickly. I've seen all the usual German & Japanese suspects speeding uphill along with various and sundry 30+ year old pickups & SUV's flailing their way to the top at 80+. In general when I see those older 4x4 rigs coming up fast behind me I move far over to the right as I don't know how they keep those things on the road. Going downhill it's easy to maintain 70 MPH without ever touching the gas but for one or two spots, same for the brakes; but one has to be ready for the turns. All in all these snow tires are about 5 MPH slower on that road than my regular tires.

But in the snow they are great. I have them mounted on the original 17" aluminum wheels and driving for Uber my van goes through the car wash every morning so it's as clean as I can get it and to keep salt and other crap off the wheels and undercarriage. I purchased a complete set of matching aluminum wheels with tires at a local salvage yard and have been running those when there's no snow. I'll need to replace two of those tires in the near future.

As a former tire store manager the only advantage I can think of that steel wheels have over aluminum is their ability to be hammered out by almost anyone after a misadventure with a curb or other immovable object. Aluminum wheels can be repaired but it typically has to be done by a professional trained to do so. As far as corrosion goes, both steel and aluminum are susceptible to it but with proper care and maintenance any damage can be prevented or minimized. Clear coat can and will come off aluminum wheels just as paint on steel wheels; but a bit of sandpaper, polishing compound, and a respray of clear coat an aluminum wheel can look almost new again, just as a steel wheel with some rust remover, sand paper, and paint. So the choice is really whether you want to drive a nice looking vehicle during the winter or one with ugly black wheels or cheap hubcaps that will most likely be impossible to keep on the vehicle while driving in deep snow. At least that's been my experience.
Good luck!
 

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I could use some winter tire advice. I will be purchasing winter tires for my new to me 2012 Chrysler Town and Country Touring-L. I also want to buy decent looking rims as well. I hate those awful looking steel rims that rust and look like crap. Could I get some suggestions as to a good winter tire and where is a good place to buy the rims? Also if I get new rims what happens with the TPMS?

I am looking at some tires at Canadian Tire that are on special right now. They are the Bridgestone Blizzak WS90 or the Michelin X-Ice snow and also wondering if checking with the junkyards to see if they have some decent rims that come off a 2012 Chrysler Town and Country.

Would appreciate any advice you can offer.
I have a pair of Chrysler chrome 17鈥 wheels with 90% of tread would sell for 295.00 I can send u pics shipping wound be from Denver co
 

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My 2014 T&C has its original wheels and zero rust or corrosion. This is in the Lake Erie snow belt where salt and brine are heavily used. If appearance is important buy four matching wheels from whatever source has the best price.
 

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I would consider the two biggies, Blizzak or Hakkapeliitta (no studs, hydrophilic tread compound, much, much better than studs in any condition). Blizzaks have been around a long time and that means something. One of my old friends asked the same question a few years ago and I gave him the same advice. Dump the studs and go hydrophilic. He did Blizzaks and reported back that in the worst snow in the state, that he traversed regularly, his all wheel drive Toyota van "drove like it was on rails". Hakkapeliitta comes by way of Finland and if the Fins don't know what works in snow, nobody does. As for wheels, go used from a reputable salvage yard near you. Steel works for winter. I see that car-part.com has steel 17x6-1/2 wheels for around the $70.00 mark.
 

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Spray them with Fluid Film and put wheel covers on them, is the easy route.

To make them look better requires a bit of work.
Clean with soap and water
Dry
Brush on rust converter to the rust spots only (read directions first)
Do a second application of rust converter (available at Canadian Tire - Rust Check brand))
Spray on a rust preventative black enamel type paint (Tremclad, Rustoleum, Armor Coat (CTC), Whatever)
Let dry and apply a second coat
Treat yourself to fish and chips.
Yes Yes and Yes. Buy an aftermarket black stock rims the same size as your original summer wheels. Treat the rims as the above members suggest. Then find a cheap set of plastic hub caps that match as close as you can to your summer wheels. Later when you have a lot of miles on your rig and bend a rim instead of spending a lot of dollars on a new wheel you can substitute a winter rim and cover it with your cheap hub cap. I had to do this twice. A friend of mine was looking at my rig and suggested I should put both the cheap wheels/hub caps on the same side. Whoops!
 

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Did anybody say that metal studs in tires are illegal? A long time ago I had studs in snow tires. Great on ice and snow. On dry pavement trying to stop at highway speeds could be deadly. Immediate loss of traction because of the steel studs.
 

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I never had an issue with steelies on my Caliber, and I had them for a decade with almost no rust. I never treated them, just washed them regularly. I have seen OEM and aftermarket steel wheels with rust issues so YMMV.

The only reason I have aluminum winters for the Jeep is because I wanted the same specs as my factory wheels

We have steelies on the Prius for the winter tires now.
 

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Did anybody say that metal studs in tires are illegal? A long time ago I had studs in snow tires. Great on ice and snow. On dry pavement trying to stop at highway speeds could be deadly. Immediate loss of traction because of the steel studs.
Different regions have different regulations regarding metal studs. Here in Manitoba, you are only allowed to use them during certain months of the year. These regulations vary between different states and provinces. I've had both studded and studless tires on several vehicle types over the years. Studless absolutely have better traction on dry pavement, but the only thing that can beat a good quality studless tire on ice is a studded tire... Personally, I prefer studless tires as of late...
 

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I'm ordering up, today, the Continental WinterContact SI Plus tires that are on sale at Canadian tire this week plus there's a mail in rebate of $60.00. They have road rated it at 98, which is very high. I like the comfort/road noise rating of 100% although tires tend to get noisier as they get worn.


Total price, in Cart, $678.52 plus tax = $778.00 plus there's the mail in rebate after that.
Picked up the tires this evening, made in Germany on the 10th, 11th, 12th and 15th week of 2021.
 
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Picked up the tires this evening, made in Germany on the 10th, 11th, 12th and 15th week of 2021.

Total price, in Cart, $678.52 plus tax = $778.00 plus there's the mail-in rebate after that.
Not in Mississauga... $903.96 plus tax = $1021.47 which is more than the Michelin XIce Snow that I got last year... I paid $1,032 + tax including 4 steelies ($240) + installation, balancing and shipping :)
Tires only $792 + tax = $895
 
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Not in Mississauga... $903.96 plus tax = $1021.47 which is more than the Michelin XIce Snow that I got last year... I paid $1,032 + tax including 4 steelies ($240) + installation, balancing and shipping :)
Tires only $792 + tax = $895
You didn't buy when on sale at Canadian Tire.
 

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You didn't buy when on sale at Canadian Tire.
I don't need to buy... but you said they are on sale this week... well, not in Mississauga... probably not in ON but in NS :)
 

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I don't need to buy... but you said they are on sale this week... well, not in Mississauga... probably not in ON but in NS :)
That sale ended on Thursday. A different selection of tires is on sale beginning yesterday.
 
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