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had to do alignment on my 2005 chrysler town and country. since done i have a wobble in the steering when i hit a bump in the road. i have ensured that everything was tightned down as it should be. does anyone have any ideas that might help me to get the issue fixed? Thanks!
 

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You paid for a service, and it's not right. Take it back and complain. Even if they didn't cause the issue, they should be able to pinpoint the source.

It sounds like a possible bad strut or worn suspension component. It's hard to tell without actually looking at it, though.
 

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They shouldn't be aligning a vehicle that has any looseness in the front suspension/steering.

Bad tire or loose wheel. Perhaps they knocked a weight off.

Not this?
Death Wobble
Death wobble is a rapid oscillating in your steering components and results in your steering wheel moving quickly from side to side.
Sometimes switching the font wheels from side to side will get rid of unexplainable wobble problems.
 
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If everything is correctly tightened, then it does sound like you have worn components... quite possibly the cause of your need for an alignment to start with.

Odd the alignment shop didn't mention anything though as most reputable alignment shops look for such problems and refuse to do the work until identified problems are corrected (It's hard to warranty an alignment with bad components). Otherwise, doing an alignment with worn components is a waste of time/money... and likely to cause customers to come back angry at a perceived bad alignment job.

I agree with the recommendation to take it back to the shop that did the work and complain. You may get out of there only having to pay for the additional repairs if it's something they should have caught before doing the alignment.

If you want to do some simple checks yourself, then I'd suggest jacking up one front wheel off the ground at a time, grabbing the jacked up tire by the tread at 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock, and then try twisting the wheel as if turning it left/right. You shouldn't get any significant movement and certainly shouldn't hear any clunking. If you do, then you've got mechanical problems. You can do similar checks at 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock as if trying to force a camber change but you'll want to make sure you've got the van securely up on jack stands for safety as the last thing you want to happen is for the van to come down with your hand under the tire! You should pretty much be able wrestle that tire any direction you want to without much movement or noise if all of your hardware is good.

I've also seen folks do such checks with the vehicle on the ground prior to track events, such as SCCA events where they won't let you run if they find a suspension problem, but you have to really put some grunt into it while on the ground. Jacking the wheel allows you to do this without nearly as much force.
 

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Take it back to the alignment shop. Most shops usually offer one year free alignment. Even if it was not their fault, they should be able to find the problem for free.
 

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They likely knocked a wheel weight off during the alignment. Maybe, just maybe, to get you to come back. Shops have done worse things.

'You have to upsell them': Marketplace exposes how dealerships push maintenance you don't need
After Celsie dropped off her car, an assistant service manager called to say her rear brakes needed replacing for $621 because of a rusty, warped brake drum that he said was causing vibration. He also recommended a brake flush for $121.
 

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I doubt they would intentionally remove a weight. If a weight is missing it was probably accidentally knocked off by the reflector mount.

Worn component is most likely. A ripped lower control arm bushing can hold solid with tension on it from a bad alignment, but straighten it up and it relieve that tension and it will wobble. They should have caught something like that and required it to be repaired before the alignment though. If they do find something worn out, make sure to get a free alignment after the repair since it shouldn't have been done beforehand.
 
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He also said it starts to wobble after he hits a bump. A missing wheel weight should make it wobble all the time when he hits a certain speed.
 

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He also said it starts to wobble after he hits a bump. A missing wheel weight should make it wobble all the time when he hits a certain speed.
Hitting a bump sounds like death wobble or a rotor with a headache. Warped sense of humor, l know. :)
If the wobble wasn't there before, then a missing wheel weight sounds logical. Maybe things didn't get tightened up properly. Swapping the front wheels, side to side, for the Jeep, got rid of that type of wobble..
To the OP: Were the front wheels removed? Why was the alignment done in the first place?
 

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I never heard of a Caravan with death wobble problems, but I suppose it can happen. Jeeps are the ones known to wobble like a worn out shopping cart. :)

I passed a lifted XJ going the other direction one day, and I could actually see the front wheels rapidly darting back and forth.:oops:
 

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I never heard of a Caravan with death wobble problems, but I suppose it can happen. Jeeps are the ones known to wobble like a worn out shopping cart. :)

I passed a lifted XJ going the other direction one day, and I could actually see the front wheels rapidly darting back and forth.:oops:
:) It's a solid front axle driven problem. Until now. :)
Death wobble typically occurs at speeds above 45 mph and in most cases requires a trigger like hitting a bump or a pothole. It can also happen at speeds under 45 mph. One of the common death wobble myths is it can't happen to stock Jeeps, only ones that have been lifted. Any solid front axle vehicle runs the risk of experiencing death wobble. However, it is true that if you have done any suspension upgrades (Ex: Lift kits) you are more likely to experience death wobble.
 

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When I was young and didn't know anything, I briefly had a '77 Cutlass that was in sad shape. When I hit a bump or pothole on the right side, it went into a wobbling, steering wheel jerking fit. :oops: I never looked into why because someone bought it to use for an enduro car.
 

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Not an alignment issue, but rather some part is loose. I don't know that you can blame the alignment shop for not finding it first, especially if it requires hitting a bump to feel it. Our 2002 T&C gives a slight wobbly feel when driving over pocky asphalt, which is true probably since we bought it 12 yrs ago w/ 155K miles. I changed both steering outer tie rods years ago since they showed slight play, but no difference. I didn't change the inner tie rods, but I see no play now.

My suspicion is the upper strut bearing pad, which allows the strut to rotate. That is a cheap part, but you must remove the whole strut and take it apart to change. Instead I have entire strut assemblies (w/ spring) on hand (got one for $25 via ebay liquidator), which are termed "a quick-strut" but haven't bothered to change them yet since the problem is almost negligible. I will need to do an alignment after changing, but I manage that myself at home. No need for a laser machine if you own a carpenter's level and a tape measure.
 

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I got spoiled when I had an alignment machine at my disposal at the last shop I worked at. Every time I have taken a vehicle somewhere for an alignment, it has been a crapshoot as to what kind of bad results I was going to receive.

One vehicle, they marred up brand new alloy wheels and broke the caps off several of my brand new lug nuts, and when confronted, they basically said too bad, so sad. :mad:

Another, they sent me out with the steering wheel crooked, and claimed nothing could be done about it. I complained, and he put it on the rack and started blindly adjusting the toe. I said hey, I could eyeball it in my driveway.:rolleyes:

That was the last alignment I have paid for. I redid the front end on that vehicle with new struts and mounts, control arm/ball joint assemblies, and tie rod ends. I set the camber with a plumb bob and the toe with a tape measure. It took a couple tries to get the steering wheel arrow straight, but it drove and handled better than ever and wore the tires perfectly even. I did the same when I replaced front end parts on my last vehicle.

Once I get moved and set up in the garage at my new place, I am going to pick up a set of alignment turntables and a caster/camber gauge set. I'm just not paying $50 to $100 for an alignment to get crap results and/or a damaged vehicle.
 

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I used to set the alignment on my '87 Camaro since the stock settings called for positive camber, which wore out the outside edges of the tires really bad. Plus it understeered like a pig with that setting, even worse when I first drove it on a road race track. I set the alignment at home, went to have it checked at the shop, where they told me the camber was out of spec. Once I explained to them my reasoning, they were OK with it. The front tires wore nice and even, and the handling was more neutral. Replacing the rear sway bar with a slightly bigger one balanced it perfectly so that I could drift around a corner with all 4 tires squealing instead of just the fronts begging for mercy. :)

I think we've had the alignment checked on our GC once or twice the past 11 years and 174k miles. The tires always wear even and it handles how I'd expect a minivan to handle...
 

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The alignment specs for the Ford Aspire that I mentioned above that I redid the front end and aligned myself called for a decent amount of positive camber. I set it just a hair on the negative side, and liked the way it drove and handled much better. Tire wear was just as good as it was or better.
 
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